Wirecard, GreyMountain, And The Binary Options Fraud ...

Defending the Draft 2020: Las Vegas Raiders

Season Review
The final season of the Oakland Raiders and the second in Jon Gruden’s second tenure had a small dose of optimism. After a paltry 4 win season in 2018 the Raiders brought in NFL Network analyst Mike Mayock to be the new General Manager. While few of the free agents that the Raiders brought in were able to make a major impact, save Richie Incognito at Left Guard and Trent Brown at Right Tackle, many of the rookies brought in did. Josh Jacobs, Trayvon Mullen, Maxx Crosby, Hunter Renfrow, Foster Moreau, and Clelin Ferrell all saw significant snaps. Johnathan Abram was on his way to having a starter role but was lost for the season on week 1 due to a torn rotator cuff and labrum. There was also this whole Antonio Brown thing going on. I think it's safe to say that I don’t need to get into the details on that. However, Carr losing the best wide receiver he would have ever had to play with and whom a big chunk of the playbook was geared towards was a mighty bow to the Raiders offense.
When the schedule was released there was no question that the front half was brutal with 5 weeks straight of non-home games (4 away and 1 London). The optimism of a playoff berth in the Raiders final season in Oakland only grew when they made it through that stretch going into week 12 at 6-4. Sadly, that’s when the lack of depth and quality weapons started to rear its ugly head and the Raiders went on to win only 1 of their final 6 games including a dismal 4 game losing streak which had the Raiders getting blown out by the Jets, Chiefs, and Titans. In that stretch the Raiders managed to lose in the final game at the Oakland Coliseum to the Jacksonville Jaguars. Not Great. However, they managed to split the last two games of the year, ending the season at 7-9 and in 3rd place in the AFC West.
Notable Pre-Draft Acquisitions
Corey Littleton, LB, LAR (3 years, $35.25m, $22m G)
PFF Grade - 78.9 (8th of 89)
To say that the Raiders have had a dearth of talent at linebacker over the past decade is an understatement. Such names like Perry Riley, Nick Roach and Will Compton have seemed like upgrades for our team. Not very inspiring. Mayock and Gruden clearly wanted to focus on improving this position and attacked the best linebacker on the market in Littleton. The Raiders have been victimized by tight ends and pass catching running backs and having an athletic coverage specialist like Littleton will only help the Raiders defense.
Carl Nassib, DE, TB (3 years, $25.25m,$16.75m G)
PFF Grade - 69.3 (43rd of 106)
Even with the additions of Clelin Ferrell and Maxx Crosby in the 2019 draft the Raiders had a need at defensive end. Nassib gives the Raiders another long and high motor rusher who can hold the edge. Nassib may not be a high end player, but he’s going to be a valuable piece on the defensive line.
Nick Kwiatkoski, LB, CHI (3 years, $21m, $13.75m G)
PFF Grade - 72.6 (15th of 89)
The Raiders doubled down with linebackers by adding Kwiatkoski to pair with Littleton. The Raiders have since said that they are going to have Kwiatkoski wear the green dot on defense and playing MIKE. Kwiat may be lacking in starting experience but the Raiders are betting on his upside after showing out for Chicago this past season. The former Bear LB showed good coverage drops in conjunction with intelligence and physicality and should be a nice partner to Littleton.
Marcus Mariota, QB, TEN (2 years, $17.6m, $7.5m G)
PFF Grade - 64.3 (27th of 37)
It's no mystery that Raider Nation has a love/hate relationship with Derek Carr. While Carr is the unquestioned starter, Mariota will be there in case Carr is unable to play up to the standards of Gruden. Mariota still has good mobility for the position but the Raiders have been vocal about wanting to get him healthy first and foremost.
Maliek Collins, DL, DAL (1 year, $6m, $5.75m G)
PFF Grade - 65.1 (65th of 115)
One interesting move made by the Raiders this offseason was the hiring of Rod Marinelli (and letting go of Bretson Buckner). Marinelli made his influence and presence known with two signings, the first of which was for Maliek Collins (the other being Jeff Heath but I’m not gonna devote a ton of time to a backup safety/ST player). Collins is a solid interior pass rusher who still has his best years ahead of him. Jon Hankins is locked into our starting 1T role but the 3T is up for grabs between Collins and Mo Hurst, who ended 2019 very strongly.
Jason Witten, TE, DAL (1 year, $4m, $3.5m G)
PFF Grade - 59.4 (43rd of 67)
Yes yes. Of course a Jon Gruden-led team spent $4m on a possible TE2. Overpay aside, Witten gives Carr another red zone threat and the Raiders TE room a role model professional again. It’s only a 1 year deal so this deal won’t be too impactful but anytime you can sign a former Monday Night Football broadcaster you gotta do it right?
Damarious Randall, S, CLE (1 year, $1.5m, $1.5m G)
PFF Grade - 69.3 (40th of 88)
The Raiders secondary was not good in 2019. They attempted to fix this by signing Byron Jones but Miami got him for more guaranteed money. They tried for Chris Harris Jr but he liked the fit of the Chargers deal. They even agreed to terms with Eli Apple but that fell apart due to medical issues. Once that happened they used some of that money to bring in Randall, who will compete with Erik Harris to play FS.
Major Needs Entering Draft
The Raiders entered draft day with 2 major needs, wide receiver and cornerback. They also needed depth all over the defense, especially at running back and linebacker. There was continuing talk of quarterback but despite the signing of Mariota there were still rumblings of a Jalen Hurts or Jordan Love selection.
Las Vegas Raiders 2020 Draft
Round 1 (12th Overall) - Henry Ruggs III, WR, Alabama
5-11, 185lbs ---- Junior ---- PFF Grade: 75.0
Team Fit: Wide receiver was the clear need for the Las Vegas Raiders coming into draft night. With their pick of the top 3 wide outs in the class they went for the one with the best athletic profile and that was Henry Rugs III. Ruggs should be able to start very quickly for the Raiders and gives Derek Carr an explosive weapon who can win in numerous ways. Mayock also brought up how Ruggs could possibly return kicks and use that 4.27 speed to flip the field in special teams. There were some rumors about the Raiders moving back with Tampa here but were pretty locked in on Ruggs. I’d assume they didn’t want to risk San Francisco getting yet another target in consecutive drafts (2018 was McGlinchey and 2019 was Bosa).
Vic Analysis: Ruggs came into draft day as my 15th overall player and WR4. I had a firm round 1 grade on him as well. It is no secret to say that Ruggs has an elite trump card in his speed and is able to use that speed both deep down the field and in his after the catch ability. Ruggs isn’t the typical speed target with bad hands either. His 10 1/8th” mitts show up on tape and he uses them to make catches outside his body despite his smaller size. The Raiders should make it a habit to get the ball in Ruggs’ hands as often as possible because his speed will stretch defenses both vertically and horizontally. The Raiders have a true #1 target in Darren Waller and a good slot in Hunter Renfrow, meaning Ruggs doesn’t need to put up gawdy stats in order to be influential or valuable. Just by being on the field he will open up things underneath for our other targets. Mayock and Gruden have both raved about Ruggs' work ethic and football intelligence. Ruggs does need to try and improve on his physicality while in his routes and at the catch point but at his size that’s not an easy task. However, with Ruggs combination of athleticism, ball skills, route running, football IQ, and fearlessness he should be a staple in the offense of the Las Vegas Raiders.
Round 1 (19th Overall) - Damon Arnette, CB, Ohio State
6-0, 195lbs ---- Redshirt Senior ----PFF Grade: 75.0
Team Fit: If wide receiver was the biggest need for the Raiders, second place would be cornerback. It was heavily rumored that the Raiders were interested in taking Clemson’s A.J. Terrell at 19 but when Atlanta scooped him up the Raiders went to the next guy on their board in Ohio State’s Damon Arnette. It didn't sound like there was much interest from other teams to move up to 19 so the Raiders stuck with their guns and picked up Arnette. Just like Clelin Ferrell in 2019, the higher than anticipated draft slot will shadow these guys throughout their rookie contracts. If they perform as the Raiders expect it won’t matter but that remains to be seen.
Vic Analysis: Arnette was my CB8 with a round 2 grade. Arnette may lack ideal length but he is an adept press corner and that makes him an ideal fit for Guenther’s defense. The former Buckeye is able to disrupt routes at the line of scrimmage by being physical and aggressive. He is highly experienced and technically sound as one would expect from a senior in an Ohio State secondary. Arnette has buttery hips that flip with ease and his feet are super quick as well, leaving him able to turn and run with receivers throughout their route. Arnette hasn’t had great ball production but he flashes the ability to make plays on the ball by anticipating the receiver and attacking the catch point even with his back to the ball. Arnette may have tested poorly in his 40 time (4.56)at the Combine, but he plays much faster on film and in my opinion his athletic profile is a plus, not a minus.
Round 3 (80th Overall) - Lynn Bowden Jr, RB, Kentucky
5-11, 204lbs ---- Junior ---- PFF Grade: 73.0
Team Fit: Raiders’ leadership has made it clear that they wanted to increase the number of weapons at Derek Carr’s disposal. Lynn Bowden Jr gives the Raiders QB a versatile weapon who projects best as an offensive chess piece, called a Joker in Gruden’s offense. Bowden can back up Jacobs at RB, jump into the slot at WR, and return punts as well. Bowen has overcome a tough upbringing, is gritty as hell, and still has a chip on his shoulder, making him an ideal Raider. Mayock has said that the Raiders are going to train Bowden, “..to be a running back. If he’s able to handle that job, then we’ll be able to do some other things with him. We’ll move him around, let him catch the football and return punts.”
Vic Analysis: Bowden was definitely a fun study. Despite spending much of the season playing wildcat QB after multiple QB injuries, Bowden ended up as my WR17 (RB8 if I put him with the RBs) with a round 3 grade. Bowden is a tough as nails player who thrives with the ball in his hands. As a runner he mixes his solid field vision with a willingness to run with both power and elusiveness. As a receiver he showcases good hands and the traits needed to improve as a route runner. He still requires some work releasing against press coverage and breaking free downfield against tight coverage. While Bowden has had some experience rushing from the backfield, that’s still going to need some development being a running back and not the QB. I expect that year 1 will be more schemed touches and that added development will give him a more defined role in the Raiders offense.
Round 3 (81st Overall) - Bryan Edwards, WR, South Carolina
6-3, 215lbs ---- Senior ----PFF Grade: 77.9
Team Fit: Did you know that the Raiders really, really wanted to improve their weapons? If you didn’t before it should be obvious now. So far, the Raiders have added a speedster in Ruggs, a do-it-all weapon in Bowden and now the big body possession receiver in Bryan Edwards. Edwards will probably start the year as the Raiders WR4, behind Ruggs, Tyrell Williams, and Hunter Renfrow. I suspect in year 2 he’ll end up being our X receiver taking over for Tyrell.
Vic Analysis: Bryan Edwards graded out as my WR15 and a 3rd Round Grade. Edwards is a big bodied receiver who thrives over the middle of the field. He needs to improve the consistency in his hands catching, but he flashes the ability to do so. Edwards is physical and sneakily elusive with the ball in his hands. He has the explosiveness and long speed to win deep and the route running to win closer to the line of scrimmage as well. He’ll need to shore up his releases against press coverage but he certainly has the requisite tools in his toolbox to do so. He had to battle some awful quarterback play while at South Carolina and going from the likes of Jake Bentley to Derek Carr should help him continue to improve and be a contributor to the Las Vegas offense.
Round 3 (100th Overall) - Tanner Muse, LB, Clemson
6-2, 227lbs ---- Redshirt Senior ---- PFF Grade: 83.0
Team Fit: Even with the signings of Corey Littleton and Nick Kwiatkoski the Raiders wanted to improve their linebacker room. After trading back from 91 they targeted a hybrid player from their favorite school, Clemson. Muse will start out playing special teams for Rich Bisaccia while growing and learning both MIKE and WILL linebacker. Muse fits the Raiders blueprint of a tough, fast athlete with high football and non-football character. Already good friends with Clelin Ferrell, Muse could end up being the third Clemson starter on defense come 2022.
Vic Analysis: I had Tanner Muse graded as a safety and it wasn’t great. He was S17 with a Late Day 3 Grade. Muse was at his best attacking downhill, shedding and avoiding blocks, and not having to do too much diagnosing. I’m not sure Muse will have the ability to keep up with shiftier backs or tight ends, but the potential is there for him to be a solid man coverage player. Worst case he can still blitz and be an early down contributor along with his special teams work. Are there players I would have preferred at 100? Sure are, but Muse fits the Raiders blueprint and with two locked in starters at linebacker getting a developmental player isn’t a bad move. It just might have been early and like with Arnette, if Muse performs his draft slot won’t matter too much.
Round 4 (109th Overall) - John Simpson, OG, Clemson
6-4, 321lbs ---- Senior ---- PFF Grade: 70.2
Team Fit: Remember how I said Mayock and Gruden love Clemson players? Well here’s another one to add into the mix. The Raiders were surprised to see Simpson on the board come Day 3 and made a trade up to come and get their guy. With Richie Incognito getting up there in age and Gabe Jackson dealing with both injuries and underperformance (while having a cap hit close to $10m) the Raiders made it a priority to find someone to take over if they wanted to move on from either. There have been rumors the Raiders had Jackson on the trade block but couldn’t get any takers so he’s graduated to becoming a potential cap casualty. If that’s the case Simpson would compete with Denzelle Good at RG. Worst case I think he backs up Incognito before ultimately taking over at LG for the 37 year old veteran.
Vic Analysis: Simpson was my iOL10 (OG5) and had a 3rd round grade. Simpson is a big, thicc boi. The former Clemson Tiger thrives using his strength while in a phone booth. Simpson has elite length and hand strength, meaning once he gets hands on defenders he is generally taking them wherever he wants them to go. He lacks ideal foot quickness but masks it with decent vision and awareness. Simpson has an elite anchor but needs to make sure he doesn’t jeopardize it with getting too upright and risking his leverage. Simpson is a great fit for the Raiders west coast offense with a mix of gap/zone rushing concepts.
Round 4 (139th Overall) - Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech
5-9, 180lbs ---- Junior ---- PFF Grade: 90.3
Team Fit: It was borderline assumed at this point that the Raiders would trade back from 139, what with them not having any picks in the 5th, 6th, or 7th rounds. Instead, they stood pat here and selected the meanest, most fearless nickel corner they could find in Amik Robertson. Currently, LaMarcus Joyner is set to man the slot for the Raiders and if last year is any indication that isn’t the best plan. So, for insurance they went and got potentially the best slot corner in the draft in Amik Robertson. I think it's entirely possible that Amik ends up taking Joyners snaps bit by bit before starting in 2021.
Vic Analysis: Amik Robertson finished up as my CB9 with a round 2 grade. It might be safe to say that If Amik was a few inches taller that he would have gone earlier than that. Robertson plays cornerback like opposing players wanted to take his lunch money. Despite his size Robertson is able to win with physicality, instincts, and ball skills. His ability in short areas is sublime and while he can get over aggressive at times he is usually balanced covering double moves. Obviously he is going to get outmatched sometimes against bigger slot receivers but Amik will make them earn their wins.
Note: Mayock has said one of the reasons he was comfortable not having late day 3 picks was due to the shutdown related to COVID-19. With a shortened camp season he wanted to target players who would no question make the team over taking players who would be long shots.
Post Draft Acquisitions (as of 5.21)
Prince Amukamara (1 year, $1.05m, 50k G)
PFF Grade - 67.4 (43rd of 112)
Even with the Arnette and Amik draft picks, the Raiders had wanted to bring in a veteran corner who could compete with the young defensive backs on the roster for a starting role. Amukamara is a steady type who hasn’t had a ton of ball production but can get the job done in coverage. As of now he would probably be a starter with Trayvon Mullen but if Arnette shows why the Raiders picked him at 19 that could change quickly.
DeVontae Booker, RB, Denver (1 year, $1.0475m, $50k G)
PFF Grade - 65.8 (Not enough snaps to qualify)
Booker gives the Raiders another veteran back to compete in camp. He’s sturdy and good in pass protection so he might make the roster as RB4 behind Jacobs, Richard, and Bowden.
Notable Undrafted Free Agents
Dominik Eberle, K, Utah State
Camp competition for incumbent Daniel Carlson. Eberle didn't miss an extra point in college, finished with a career percentage of 79.0, and handled kick off duties for the Aggies.
Javin White, LB, UNLV
White is a hybrid defender who profiles best as a nickel linebacker and special teams player. If he's able to get ST reps he could make the back end of the roster while developing a true defensive home. Could see a path to playing time similarly to Corey Littleton.
Kamaal Seymour, OT, Rutgers
4 year starter at a mighty Rutgers (for you Looch) program who profiles better on the inside then at right tackle. The Raiders brought in a ton of options at the interior so it will be a battle for Seymour to make the roster. Practice squad candidate.
Nick Bowers, TE, Penn State
Bowers has good size and athleticism for the position. He was behind a possible 2021 1st round pick Pat Freirmuth's backup but dealt with health the majority of his time in Happy Valley. The Raiders have a deep tight end room so it will be tough for him to make the roster but he could be a practice squad candidate.
Madre Harper, CB, Southern Illinois
Strong athlete with press man traits. Needs to improve his transitions and tweak some technical details but could make the roster and see some time as a special teams player while growing at corner.
Siaosi Mariner, WR, Utah State
Jordan Love's go-to receiver in 2019, Mariner shows some decent traits at the receiver position to go with his 6-2, 205lbs frame. The top of the Raiders wide receiver depth chart is mostly set so Mariner is likely to compete for a practice squad spot. Mariner would be competing against Ateman, Doss, Gafford, Zay Jones, XFL Great De'Mornay Pierson-El and Anthony Ratliff-Williams for the final roster spot.
Mike Panasiuk, DL, Michigan State
Strong as an ox with a body made for taking blocks as a two gap defender, Panasiuk has a chance to make the roster backing up Jon Hankins at 1T. Needs to improve his pass rush but I think the traits are there for him to do so.
Liam McCullough, LS, Ohio State
He's a long snapper. He snaps the ball a long way. He will compete with current long snapper Trent Sieg.
Conclusion
The Raiders entered the off-season with major needs at wide receiver, linebacker, and cornerback. I believe they addressed two of those, wide receiver and linebacker, strongly while still needing some development for our corner room. Mayock also made sure to improve our depth all around the roster. If Derek Carr is able to continue his upwards trend in year 3 with Jon Gruden, and the pass defense improves literally at all, then the Raiders could compete for a wild card spot. Like last year they will need to survive a tough opening slate, but this time they will need to keep their momentum and not falter down the stretch. The AFC West will be a battle however as each team has made significant improvements. You could make an argument for each of Denver, LA, or Vegas to come in 2nd, 3rd, or 4th.
53 Man Roster Projection
QB - Derek Carr, Marcus Mariota
RB - Josh Jacobs, Jalen Richard, Lynn Bowden
FB - Alec Ingold
WR - Henry Ruggs, Tyrell Williams, Hunter Renfrow
WR - Bryan Edwards, Nelson Agahlor, Zay Jones
TE - Darrren Waller, Jason Witten, Foster Moreau
OT - Kolton Miller, Trent Brown, David Sharpe, Brandon Parker
iOL - Rodney Hudson, Richie Incognito, Gabe Jackson, John Simpson, Denzelle Good, Andre James
iDL - Johnathan Hankins, Maliek Collins, Maurice Hurst, P.J. Hall, Daniel Ross
DE - Clelin Ferrell, Maxx Crosby, Carl Nassib, Arden Key
LB - Corey Littleton, Nick Kwiatkoski, Nicholas Morrow, Marquel Lee, Tanner Muse
OCB - Trayvon Mullen, Prince Amukamara, Damon Arnette, Isaiah Johnson
SCB - Lamarus Joyner, Amik Robertson
FS - Damarious Randall, Erik Harris
SS - Johnathan Abram, Jeff Heath
K - Daniel Carlson
P - A.J. Cole
LS - Trent Sieg
2020 Draft Grade: B -
While the Raiders had some slight reaches, and not so slight (*cough*Tanner Muse*cough*), they also found some good values especially on day 2 with Bryan Edwards, John Simpson, and Amik Robertson. I think an aggressive projection has the Raiders with 4 players getting starter reps by the end of the season. More likely, I think Ruggs and Arentte start in 2020 and we see Edwards, Simpson and Amik each get more and more involved in 2021. Bowden will likely be a change of pace weapon throughout his rookie contract and Muse a special teams ace with some improved defensive playing time by 2022.
2020 Prediction: 8-8 (3rd in AFC West)
submitted by vicsage83 to NFL_Draft [link] [comments]

BIG OFFERT 331 COURSES FOR ONLY $125 OF MARKETING, CONSULTING, ECOMMERCE, SALES, COPYWRITEN FACEBOOK ADS AND OTHER FOR ONLY $125 ---- [email protected] ----

TAKE ADVENTAGE THIS BIG OFFERT OF 331 COURSES FOR ONLY $125
WRITE ME [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
CHECK THE LIST OF 331 COURSES

INSTAGRAM courses

1. Jeremy McGilvery - InstaPro Academy.
2. Ben Oberg – Instagram Mastery 3.0.
3. Nick Malak – Own The Gram-Your Blueprint To Dominating Instagram
4. Gunnar Gronowski – Build a Drop Shipping Store using Instagram Chat-bots
5. Christien Bouc – Grow On Instagram
6. Millionaire Mafia – Instagram Mastery 2.0 (2019)
7. Instagram Mastery and Monetization – Josue Pena
8. Nathan Chan – Instagram Domination 4.0

YOUTUBE courses

9. Jon Penberthy – Tube Ads Academy 2019
10. Dave Kaminski – YouTube Video Ads For Regular People
11. Dan Henry – YouTube Ads for Courses
12. JAMIE TECH – YOUTUBE COURSE
13. Tom Breeze – YouTube Ad Workshop
14. Jordan Mackey – Youtube Advanced Masterclass
15. Graham Stephan – The YouTube Creator Academy
16. Kody – Youtube Mastery Class
17. Jordan Mackey – Make Money On Youtube Made Easy 2019
18. David Vlas – Youtube Compilation Machine
19. Matt Par – Make Money On YouTube without Making Videos
20. Hooman Nouri – YouTube Mastery [Download]
21. Brko Banks – Youtube Mastery [Download]
22. David Vlas – Youtube Revenue Machine [Download]
23. Brko Banks Course – How To Make Money On Youtube [Download]
24. Jordan Mackey – Youtube Advanced Masterclass 2019 – Over $50k Per Month From Youtube
25. Sean Cannell – 10X Your Brand With YouTube
26. Paul Murphy – Affiliate YouTube Success
27. BECOME A SUCCESSFUL PRODUCT REVIEWER ON YOUTUBE
28. YouTube Marketing Become a Digital TV Star in Your Niche
29. Bulletproof Youtube Ads by Adskills

TIK TOK courses

30. Rachel – The TikTok Academy

TWITTER courses

31. Jose Rosado – Twitter Money Mastery
32. Twitter SEO Academy – Bradley Benner

FACEBOOK courses

33. Cat Howell – Facebook Ads That Convert 3.0
34. Patrick wind – Facebook Ads Accelerator
35. Joanna Wiebe – 10x Facebook Ads
36. Anissa Holmes – Facebook Bootcamp
37. Andra Vahl – Facebook Advertising Secrets
38. Rachel Miller – Moolah’s Grow Your Audience Course (Facebook Page Strategies)
39. Chris Winters – F.A.M. Facebook Agency Machine
40. Kallzu – Facebook Agency Machine
41. Joanna Wiebe – 10x Facebook Ads
42. Ben Adkins – Facebook Ads Backpack Guide Advanced 2019
43. Wholesale Hackers – Facebook Ads for Real Estate
44. Keith Krance – Facebook Ads University Elite 2019
45. Brian Pfeiffer & Ross Minchev – FaceBook Diet Made EZ Video Course
46. iStack Training – Facebook & Ecom Mastery event Barcelona Replay 2019
47. Istack Training – Facebook & Ecom Mastery event Las Vegas Replay 2019 [Download]
48. Manuel Suarez & Ben Cummings – Facebook Masters Course
49. Peter Parks – Social Ads For FB Marketing
50. Chris Winters – F.A.M. Facebook Agency Machine
51. Freedom Junkies – Crushing Facebook Ads
52. FB Ads Machine 2.0 – Dan DaSilva, Mike Dolev

FILMMAKE/VIDEO courses

53. Parker Walbeck – Full Time Filmmaker
54. Parker Walbeck – Course Creator Pro $ (only on request)
55. Werner Herzog – Teaches Filmmaking
56. Eric Thayne – Six Figure Filmmaker
57. Hollywood Camera Work – The Master Course
58. Bimber – Viral Magazine, Video, News WordPress Theme (DOWNLOAD)
59. Christopher Perilli – The Video Authority
60. Max Rylski – Video Graphics Bonanza V2
61. Video Motion Pro | The New Way to Create Highly Profitable Videos and Info Products Quickly and Easily
62. Ryan Deiss – Script a High Converting Video Sales Letter
63. First Page Videos – Brian Dean
64. Video Series AWE18 Replay
65. Zamurai Video Immersion
66. Ben Adkins – Clients From Video
67. Video Breakthrough Academy – Clark Kegley
68. Perfect Pitch Videos
69. How to Create Video Tutorials and Perform on Camera
70. Video Ads Traffic
71. 10X Your Conversion With a Video Landing Page

DROPSHIPPING courses

72. Scott Hilse – Simplified Dropshipping 3.0
73. SIMPLIFIED SHOPIFY DROPSHIPPING – SCOTT HILSE
74. ANTON KRALY – DROPSHIP LIFESTYLE 6.0
75. ANTON KRALY – DROPSHIP LIFESTYLE 5.0
76. Anton Kraly - Dropship Lifestyle
77. Biaheza's Full Dropshipping Course(for download)
78. Andrei Kreicbergs – eBay Dropshipping Coaching 2.0
79. Adam Thomas – Dropshipping Accelerator 2018
80. Hayden Bowles – Hacking Shopify Dropshipping
81. Paul Joseph – Dropshipping Titans
82. Kevin David – Shopify Dropshipping Ninja MasterClass
83. Online Auction Flipping (eBay dropshipping guide)
84. Dropshipping with Aliexpress Build and Launch your Store
85. Dream Dropshipping – Online Empire Academy(for download)
86. Advanced Dropshipping Class Till Boadella
87. Online Empire Academy – Dream Dropshipping – Value $997

EBAY and AMAZON courses

88. Beau Crabill – Full eBay Course
89. Roger & Barry – eBay Underground Sales
90. Online Auction Flipping (eBay dropshipping guide)
91. Andrei Kreicbergs – Ebay Dropshipping Coaching Course
92. Simon Charlton – eBay To Amazon Arbitrage Guide
93. eBay Powerseller academy: comprehensive in depth study
94. eBay for newbies: learn the basics to start selling on eBay
95. [Download] “The eCominomics Blueprint” – Resell on eBay/Amazon for PENNIES on the dollar
96. eBay: Make Money Flipping Cars On eBay
97. [Download] Ebay’s Quick Cash-Out 2.0
98. [Download] eBay Sellers Ultimate Bootcamp Double Your Profits
99. eBay Partner Network: Create Affiliate​ Home Business Fast
100. Cold Email Kings – The Exact COLD Email Sequence to Ultimately Partner with Amazon
101. Dan Meadors – The Amazon Wholesale Formula 2019
102. Michelle Barnum Smith – Amazon Messenger
103. Youngjoon Sun – Amazon FBA Mastermind
104. Matthew Gambrell – Amazon Assassin Drop Shipping Course
105. Augustas Kligys – European Amazon Summit
106. Get Seller Tradecraft – Amazon Playbook
107. Andrew Minalto – Amazon Sharks
108. Jordan Kilburn – Amazon Millionaire Mentorship Program
109. Philip A. Covington – The Ultimate Amazon Seller
110. Todd Snively, Chris Keef – Ecomm Elite Wholesale Amazon
111. Kale and Taylor – Nine University 2.0
LINKEDIN courses
112. Justin Welsh – The LinkedIn Playbook
113. Jimmy Coleman – LinkedIn Lead Challenge
114. Mike Cooch – LinkedIn Advertising Bootcamp
115. NATASHA VILASECA – LINKEDIN UNLEASHED
116. GROWING YOUR SMALL BUSINESS WITH LINKEDIN
117. LINKEDIN INCUBATOR – LIAM AUSTIN

TRADING courses

118. Stock Options Day Trading Mindset For Success
119. Wiseguys Revealed: Modern Flow Trading
120. ABS – Reese Shapiro – Binary Option Money Making Private Method
121. CF X UNIVERSITY – CARTER FX 2.0
122. TradeSmart College – Bollinger Bands Necessities
123. WARRIOR PRO TRADING COURSE
124. MAFIA TRADING – MINDSET TRADER DAY TRADING COURSE
125. TradeSmart College – Buying and selling Plans
126. STOCK TRADING SIMPLIFIED: THE COMPLETE GUIDE FOR BEGINNERS
127. FX CARTEL TRADING COURSE
128. INVESTOPEDIA ACADEMY BY DAVID GREEN
129. GREG CAPRA – PRISTINE STOCK TRADING METHOD(for download)
130. ADVANCE STOCK TRADING (SHORT TERM, SWING AND LONG TERM)
131. The Complete Trading Course – Price Patterns, Strategies, Setups, And Execution Tactics By Corey Rosenbloom
132. Cryptocurrency Trading And Ico Investment Masterclass 2018 | Blockchain
133. ROCKY DARIUS – Crypto Trading Mastery Course
134. The Trading Boss Method 1 And 2
135. RASHAD SMITH – 7 Figures Forex Course
136. The Forex Scalper Mentorship Package(for download)
137. PIPS UNIVERSITY – The Only Forex Course You Will Ever Need(For Download)
138. URBAN FOREX – Mastering Price Action
139. ATLAS FOREX – FOREX COURSE
140. FOREVER BLUE – FOREX COURSE
141. ANGEL TRADERS FOREX STRATEGY COURSE
142. MAKE MONEY WORK FROM HOME ONLINE TRADE FOREX 4 BEGINNERS
143. JASON STAPLETON – TRADERS WORKSHOP FOREX FULL COURSE
144. FOREX TRADING FOR NEWBIES
145. CRYPTO TRADING MASTERY COURSE

ECOM courses

146. Jared Goetz – Ecom Hacks Academy 2020
147. Marvin Hospes – eCom Success 3.0
148. Sarah Chrisp – Ecomm Clubhouse
149. Deepwork Labs – eCommerce Accelerator
150. Tony Folly – eCommerce Masterclass-How To Build An Online Business 2019
151. Vince Wang & Jordan Welch – eCom Accelerators Private Mastermind Replays
152. Gabriel St. Germain – eCom Blueprint 2.0
153. Ricky Hayes – Ecom Lifestyle University
154. Rafael Cintron – 7 Figure Ecommerce Inner Circle
155. iStack Traning – Ecommerce Mastery live Asia Thailand 2019
156. Tai Lopez – ECOM Agency
157. Ecom Titans – Keys To Consistency
158. Gabriel Beltran – The Ecom Millionaire Mastermind, Miami
159. Bill Dalessandro – Ecommerce: Product To Profit
160. Matt Gartner – eCom Lab
161. Arie Scherson – Ecom Inner Circle
162. Matt Gartner – 8 Hour eCommerce Profits
163. Justin Cener – eCommerce Bootcamp Mentor Program
164. Anthony Mastellone – eCom Success Lab
165. Earnest Epps – High Ticket eCom Secrets
166. Jon Mac – Ecommerce Accelerator
167. Seth Smith – Advanced Ecommerce Academy
168. Chris Blair – eCom Vantage

MARKETING courses

169. CXL Institute – 10 Courses Marketing Bundle
170. Matt Serwin – Klaviyo Email Marketing Masterclass
171. Million Dollar Marketing Methods – 2020 SEO
172. Fred Joyal – Marketing Course for Dental Marketing
173. Justin Jackson – Marketing For Developers
174. Brian Bewer – Madcam Marketing 2.0
175. Tiz Gambacorta – Amik Affiliate Marketing Intensive Kickstarter
176. Matt Cramer & Shayne Hillier – Real Estate Marketing Student Beta Program v2.0
177. Sean Vosler – 7 Figure Marketing Copy
178. Russ Henneberry – Content Marketing Mastery Course 2019
179. Ted McGrath – Marketing Masters Map
180. Jon Penberthy – Legit Marketing Academy 2019
181. ConversionXL, Dan McGaw – Optimizing Your Marketing Tech Stack
182. Brandon Belcher – CPA Marketing University
183. Jeremy Haynes – Digital Marketing Manuscript 2.0 + DSP
184. Mohamed Ali Aguel – Momentum Marketing Tribe
185. Jordan Steen -The Digital Marketing School
186. James Jason – Mortgage Marketing Mastery
187. Digital Marketing Nanodegree v3
188. Sean Terry – Marketing Mastery X
189. Simon Colhoun – Affiliate Marketing & List Building Video Course
190. Saj P & Jeevan S – Zero Resistance Marketing
191. Simplilearn – Digital Marketing Certification Training
192. Billy Gene’s Gene Pool | billy gene is marketing
193. Stefan James – Affiliate Marketing Mastery
194. Jaiden Gross – 30-Day Affiliate Marketing Challenge Training
ADVERTISING/ ADS courses
195. Harmon Bothers – Write Ads That Sell
196. Dental Clients – Proven Tested Ads and Funnel 2019
197. Traffic and Funnels – Advertising Workshop
198. Eugene M. Schwartz – Breakthrough Advertising
199. Kody – Advanced Bing Ads Training
200. Mike Harri – Pinterest Ads Masterclass
201. Ross Minchev – Pin Ads Jumpstart
202. Patrick Wind – Ads Accelerator Program
203. Adskills – Search And Destroy Bootcamp
204. Duston McGroarty – Push Notification Ads Masterclass
205. Epic Mail Machine – $100K Deals With No Paid Ads
206. Tristan Broughton – Google Ads Ecom Academy
207. Google Ads Mastery 2019-2020
208. Justin Sardi – Video Ads Masterclass

SALES courses

209. Josh Braun – Sales DNA
210. Dan Kennedy – Ultimate Sales Letter 2.0
211. Jim Huffman – The ClickMinded Sales Funnel Course
212. Building Sales Funnels for Backend Profits
213. GKIC – The No B.S. Renegade Guide To Putting Together A Highly Effective Sales Team

SMMA courses

214. Joel Kaplan – SMMA 7 Figure Agency
215. Quenten Chad & Jovan Stojanovic – 30 Days SMMA
216. Nick Kenens – Cold Emails for SMMA

COPYWRITING courses

217. Jim Edwards – Copywriting Secrets
218. Kyle – The Process A Draft By Draft Copywriting Walkthrough
219. Kim Krause Schwalm – Ultimate KKS Bundle (Copywriting)
220. Ray Edwards – Copywriting Academy 2
221. Shortcut Copywriting Secrets
222. Paul Hollingshead – AWAI’s Accelerated Program for Six-Figure Copywriting
223. Pam Foster – Direct Response Copywriting Course
224. Writing Tools & Hacks Copywriting/Blogging/Content Writing (Download)
225. AWAI – The Web Copywriter’s Clear Path to Profits

BLOGGING courses

226. Sarah Titus – Best Blogging Bundle
227. Ahrefs Academy – Blogging for business
228. WordPress Blogging How To Start A WordPress Blog
229. Blogging to Generate Leads: Business Blogging Essentials
CONSULTING courses
230. IMQueen – 1 Hour Consulting
231. Alex Becker – Hero Consulting Accelerator
232. Joe Soto – Local Consulting Academy Update last
233. Sabri Suby – Consulting Empire
234. John Shea – The SEO Consulting Blueprint (DOWNLOAD)
235. John Logar – Consulting Rocket
236. Sam Ovens – The Consulting Blueprint Complete

AGENCY courses

237. Elizetxe – Agency Blueprint
238. Sebastian Robeck and Bryan Ostemiller – Agency Hyper Growth
239. Michael Laurens – Agency Accelerator
240. Mariah Miller – Agency Takeoff
241. Jeff Miller – The Agency Scaling Secrets Trainings And Masterclasses
242. Natasha Takahashi – The Chatbot Agency Accelerator
243. Alex Brittingham – Agency Growth Hack
244. Jason Wardrop – The 6 Figure Agency Blueprint
245. Jeff Millers – Agency Scaling Secret
246. Bob Mangat – 7 Figure Agency Update-1
247. Joseph Davis – Underground Agency Playbook
248. Joseph Davis – Digital Agency Masterclass
249. Get Chris Record – Digital Agency Builders 2019
250. Brian Willie – Maps Liftoff Agency
251. Robb Quinn – Agency in a Box

EMAIL courses

252. Ben Settle – Email Players List Swell
253. Mike Shreeve – Email Academy
254. Alex Berman – Email 10k
255. Ezra Firestone – Smart Email Marketing 2.0
256. Matt Bacak – Email Marketing Specialist
257. HOW TO SEND UNLIMITED EMAILS STEP BY STEP
258. Ben Adkins – Cold Email Clients
259. Email Prospecting Blitz
260. Justin Cener – 97 Done For You Email Templates

BUSINNES courses

261. Max Tornow – Freedom Business Mentoring
262. Caity Hunt – Home Business Freedom Formula
263. John Whiting – Business Growth for Entrepreneurs
264. Josh Hall – Web Design Business Course
265. Andre Chaperon – Lean Business For Creators
266. Katie Yeakle – Secrets of Writing High-Performance Business-to-Business Copy
267. Beau Crabill – Credit Cards for Business

MANAGEMENT courses

268. Tai Lopez – Home Sharing Management Company
269. Ezra Firestone – Traffic MBA – Smart Project Management
ORATORY, CHARISMA, PERSUASION, FOCUS and MIND courses
270. Charlie Houpert – Charisma University
271. Jason Capital – The DOMINANCE
272. Jim Kwik – Unleash Your Brain
273. Vanessa Van Edwards – People School Science of People
274. Ramit Sethi – How To Talk To Anybody (Complete)
275. Magnetic Influence – Dani Johnson
276. Lazy Consultant System – Mitch Miller
277. Professional Speakers Academy – Andy Harrington
278. Unlimited Persuasion Power
279. Creating Fame Complete – Laura Roeder
280. [Download] HypnoRitual
281. Conversion XL – Digital Psychology and Persuasion Minidegree
282. Fascinate Your 7 Triggers to Persuasion and Captivation – Sally Hogshead
283. Persuasion IQ The 10 Skills You Need To Get Exactly What You Want
284. Power of Persuasion – Eben Pagan
285. Unlimited Persuasion Power
286. Course Builder’s Laboratory – Danny Iny
287. Bob Proctor – Magic In Your Mind
288. Mind Body Eating Online Conference
BOTS courses
289. Steve Larsen – ChatBots For MLM
290. Brian Anderson – Quantum Chat Bots
291. Nick Moreno – Messenger Bots For Entrepreneurs
292. Scott Oldford and Katya Sarmiento – Bots for Business
293. Bastian Ernst – Funnel Bots Pro
OTHER COURSES
294. Asian Efficiency – Finisher’s Fastlane
295. Colin Dijs – December Mastermind 2019
296. The Lending Lead Gen Academy
297. Stu McLaren – Tribe 2019
298. Yuping Want – Sourcing Warrior Mastermind
299. Carl Allen – Dealmaker Wealth Society
300. Nick Torson & Max Sylvestre – Quit 9 To 5 Academy
301. Bob Diamond – The Overages Blueprint 2019
302. Get Aidan Booth and Steven Clayton – Parallel Profits
303. Harlan Kilstein – Sneaker Riches
304. Tony Robbins, Dean Graziosi – The Knowledge Broker Blueprint
305. Mitch Harper – 60 Day Startup
306. RSD max - The Natural
307. Guru Siphon Formula – 6 modules & 143 videos
308. Andre Chaperon – Lean Business For Creators
309. Todd Brown – Borrowed Best Seller
JASON CAPITAL courses
310. Instagram Agent System
311. Conversation God 2019
312. Email Income Experta
313. Sales god
314. High Income Weekly Skills Training
315. Status Unleashed (bonus)
316. THE JASON CAPITAL COPYWRITING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
TAI LOPEZ courses
317. Tai Lopez - SMMA 2.0
318. Tai Lopez - Cashflow System
319. Tai Lopez - Digital Social Marketing Consultant
320. TAI LOPEZ – PRIVATE MENTOR CONFERENCE 2018
321. TAI LOPEZ –ENTREPRENEURS STARTER KIT
DAN LOK courses
322. DAN LOK – HIGH TICKET CLOSER
323. Dan Lok – Instagram Secret 2019
324. DAN LOK – PERFECT CLOSING SCRIPT
325. DAN LOK – TUBE YOUR OWN HORN
326. DAN LOK – 6 STEPS TO 6 FIGURES

IMAN GADZHI courses

327. IMAN GADZHI – AGENCY INCUBATOR
328. IMAN GADZHI – SIX FIGURE SMMA
329. IMAN GADZHI – INFLUENCER IGNITED 2.0
330. IMAN GADZHI – KAIZEN CURE
331. IMAN GADZHI – PEN TO PROFIT MEMBERSHIP

If you need proof of the courses, just let me know and if you are looking for another course that is not on the list, we will just let you know and we will give you a good price.

We have more than 1000 courses available.

Write us [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
submitted by Coursesgood to u/Coursesgood [link] [comments]

Countdown to Kickoff 2020: Portland Timbers

Countdown to Kickoff 2020: Portland Timbers

Basic Info:

Club Name: Portland Timbers
Location: Portland, Oregon
Stadium: Providence Park. Beautiful timelapse of the recent renovations.
Head Coach: Giovanni Savarese (3rd year)
Captain: Diego Valeri
CEO/Majority Owner: Merritt Paulson
USL Affiliate: Timbers 2
Kits:

2019 in Review

Final Standings: 14-13-7 (W-L-D), 49 pts, +3 GD, 6th in the West
In one word, the 2019 Portland Timbers season was draining. It was an endurance test for the players. It was an endurance test for even the most ardent supporters. And it was certainly an endurance test for a Front Office that invested serious capital into organizational infrastructure. Bookended by snowy affairs in the Rocky Mountains, a year filled with tantalizing potential melted away, leaving a passionate (some might say capricious) fanbase searching for explanations. So, what went wrong?
Well, it was always going to be an uphill battle from the opening kick. Starting with the coldest game in MLS history in Colorado, the Timbers faced a daunting 12-match road trip to accommodate the impressive renovations to Providence Park’s East stand. After accumulating 1 pt from the first six matches, including blow out losses to both FC Cincinnati (!) and then-winless San Jose, the fanbase collectively smashed the panic button entering a match against ex-coach Caleb Porter and his Columbus Crew. However, for the next few months, we witnessed a different team and a different mentality. Three consecutive quality victories against Columbus, Toronto, and RSL brought the team back from the abyss. And a subsequent win against upstart Philadelphia saw Portland finish its road marathon at a respectable 14 points.
Suddenly, the narrative flipped. Pundits consistently listed the Timbers at the top of their power rankings, and with 17 of the final 22 matches at one of the best home-field advantages in MLS, it seemed the positive momentum would prevail indefinitely. More importantly though, the Timbers had found their final piece to the puzzle: an elite, ruthless, and fiery DP striker in Brian Fernandez. Fresh off an impressive campaign with Necaxa in Liga MX, the Argentine became the first player in history to score in five consecutive regular-season games to open an MLS career. His clinicality and intensity raised the level of the squad, leading Steve Clark to don the classic Michael Myers mask from Halloween, declaring Providence Park as a “House of Horrors” for the opponent.
But as it turned out, the team never truly reacclimated to the friendly confines of its home pitch. After four months (incl. preseason) away from home, the squad’s lethal counter-attacking style was far more suited for road matches which provided no impetus to play attractive soccer. Away victories at elite opponents including NYCFC, Seattle, and LAFC provided a stark contrast to disheartening home performances against the likes of Colorado, Orlando, and 10-man Chicago. And soon, the atmosphere off-the-field began to match the team’s sudden struggles on the pitch.
Political viewpoints aside, the Iron Front protests and Diego Valeri’s contract impasse ignited an already contentious relationship between the Timbers Army and FO. Meanwhile, as the squad racked up disappointing home results due to uninspired offensive play, home attendance began to waver more so than years past. While the home sell-out streak remains to this day, the increased number of empty seats in Providence Park was a pretty blunt indication of increased apathy towards the organization.
And then, there was the cherry on top. After missing consecutive matches due to a reported “stomach bug,” it became pretty clear Brian Fernandez was not the same player he was in the early summer. With a complicated and somber family history, Fernandez had struggled with substance abuse issues in the past but seemed to be on the path to full recovery during recent years. However, in October, Fernandez entered the league’s Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program, and just as his story arc in green-and-gold faded to black, the Timbers season finished with a whimper. Jefferson Savarino’s 87th-minute goal in snowy Utah knocked the Timbers out of Cup contention. Eleven months following an exciting run to MLS Cup, Portland entered the 2020 offseason weary, drained, and searching for a new beginning.

The Coach

Giovanni Savarese
I expected 2019 to provide more clarity on Giovanni Savarese’s coaching aptitude, but as I sit here one year later, I’m still left with more questions than answers. Gio’s passion and fervor was a refreshing juxtaposition to Caleb Porter’s often smug demeanor, but his far more conservative style still ruffles the feathers of fans who yearn for the days of “Porterball.” While Savarese implemented a high-pressing, dynamic, and open style during his time at the Cosmos, he has yet to find similar success doing so in the Rose City. The past two seasons have exhibited nearly the same progression: start the season trying to play pressing-style soccer, get beat badly, and then resort to a conservative, counter-attacking approach.
The truth of the matter is the conservative style fits the Portland Timbers. When the defense is solid, Diego Valeri and Sebastian Blanco are talented enough to win the game on the counter by themselves. However, this tactical inflexibility is essentially the sole on-field contributor for why the team struggled so mightily down the stretch. When teams packed it in and eliminated the possibility of counter-attacks, Portland could not break down the opposition, resorted to launching an MLS record number of crosses, and got scorched on counters going the other way. A taste of their own medicine if you will.
In 2020, Savarese has no excuse. There’s no road trip to start the season, he has a loaded arsenal of complimentary attacking weapons, and now it’s abundantly clear the Timbers must learn how to control games from the front foot. An identity is useful, but flexibility is a requirement to be great. The club wants to (has to) win now, and they’ve invested significantly into personnel and infrastructure to do so. Now, it’s up to Savarese to lead the team to silverware.

Departures

Brian Fernandez (ST): This one hurts. There are no two ways about it. Fernandez truly convinced GM Gavin Wilkinson and TD Ned Grabavoy that he was past his struggles, but unfortunately, it didn’t turn out to be the case. As Wilkinson stated in The Athletic, “if we could go back and do it again, we wouldn’t have done it,” adding “what I will say is the word fraud exists for a reason.” Rumors suggest Necaxa covered up a failed drug test, and MLS is currently launching a lawsuit to help the club recoup the transfer fee. While Wilkinson suggests Fernandez was a bust, the truth is he scored 15 goals in ~25 games in all comps, showing a ruthlessness in front of goal that rivaled the Martinez’s and Ruidiaz’s of the league. As people who have met him can attest, he’s a vibrant and kind individual regardless of the fact he continues to face difficult obstacles off the field. It's just such a disappointment that it didn’t all come together, and I pray for his health and safety.
Zarek Valentin (RB): This one hurts too. Zarek was a staple of the community, someone who embraced Portland as his home, and was as approachable as any professional athlete. With initiatives like wearing a rainbow ribbon in his hair to fundraise for homeless LGBT+ youth, Zarek was an ideal steward for the club and community. With our lack of fullback depth, leaving him unprotected in the expansion draft was far from a popular decision - one that strained an already frayed relationship between the Front Office and some fans. That said, as amazing as Zarek is, his lack of athleticism was starting to catch up to him. He even admitted some struggles down the stretch, and as more talented/athletic wingers enter the league, his minutes might soon reflect it. Zarek’s versatility, eccentricity, and civic involvement will certainly be missed though. Houston, you’ve got a great dude.
Claude Dielna (CB): The most puzzling move of 2019, it didn’t take an acute observer to recognize that Dielna struggled in MLS. Wilkinson and Grabavoy took a one-year flier on Dielna to be the 4th-stringer, and the outcome was fairly predictable. He possesses a silky left foot which allows him to pick sharp passes out of the back, but he can’t run, can’t jump, and can’t defend 1v1. All of those attributes are pretty essential requirements for playing CB in any league, so it’s no surprise to see the organization not renew his contract. In the end, I wouldn’t suggest Dielna self-immolated like many horrific Timbers CBs of yesteryear (see McKenzie, Raushawn), but I highly doubt anyone will be pining for his return.
Foster Langsdorf (ST): Langsdorf may be used as an example of a Homegrown the Timbers failed to move through the ranks, but letting him go makes sense (unfortunately.) In a 2019 season essential for his development, he failed to make any significant impact at the USL level, and at 24, he would’ve entered the 2020 campaign in the exact spot he did the previous two seasons. Despite some clever finishes in the 2018 USL season, he’s not a legitimate option for the first team in this day in age - especially when similarly-aged strikers Felipe Mora, Jaroslaw Niezgoda, and Jeremy Ebobisse boast far more developed skillsets.
Modou Jadama (CB/RB): Jadama made two total appearances for the first team over two seasons, including one start at RB at Montreal in 2019. To be frank, he didn’t particularly shine as an MLS-caliber player during that time, so his opportunity to cement himself in the organization’s plans came and went. Now at Atlanta United 2, I think he’ll be a good fit for a full-time USL position, although we probably could have used CB depth with Bill Tuiloma’s injury.
Kendall McIntosh (GK): McIntosh was an undersized goalkeeper whose frame and athleticism is reminiscent of the likes of Nick Rimando. For the most part, he was a career T2 netminder that was far too raw in some areas to mount a challenge against experienced keepers like Jeff Attinella and Steve Clark. Now a member of the Red Bulls via the Re-Entry Draft, I doubt McIntosh finds many more minutes outside of the USL, but he seemed like a good dude and we all wish him the best.

2020 Outlook:

So, where does that leave us for the 2020 season? Well, pretty close to the same spot we found ourselves last year. In the preceding two seasons, it was clear the Timbers possessed enough talent to capture silverware, yet surpassing the final hurdle proved to be too much. As a result, continuity in terms of roster management remains among the league’s most stable. Ultimately, Portland took the field March 3 in Colorado with 10 of the 11 starters from MLS Cup the previous December, and this season, the only departure considered a surefire starter was Brian Fernandez.
However, the main difference in 2020 comes down to the acquisitions. The Timbers FO utilized the abnormally long break to load up with an arsenal of talent, providing a stark divergence from the quiet transfer window in 2019. As much as I want to compliment the FO for its hard work this offseason, acquiring fresh blood was essential. Key pieces of the core including Larrys Mabiala, Diego Chara, Sebastian Blanco, and Diego Valeri are all exiting their prime window, and the Timbers must capitalize before that window slams shut. Consequently, four of the five names you’ll see listed in the acquisitions section below were brought in to have an immediate impact and elevate an already talented squad.
As a result, in terms of pure on-paper talent, this is a Top 5 caliber MLS team. Whether Savarese can coalesce that talent into a functioning, dynamic, and successful unit is an entirely different story however. It honestly feels like a boom-or-bust type season, and I’m worried about how they’ll navigate the natural roller-coaster swings that MLS’s parity generates. So, I’ll leave you with this: if the Timbers figure out how to maintain defensive structure without resorting to a conservative shell, they’ll be one of the best teams in the league. If not, all bets are off.

Acquisitions:

Jarosław Niezgoda (ST): The Polish DP doesn’t have to single-handedly replace Brian Fernandez’s goal contributions, but make no mistake about it, the Timbers brought Niezgoda in to make an immediate and profound impact on the scoresheet. At only 24, Jarek arrives with a high pedigree having notched double-digit goals in multiple seasons for one of Poland’s powerhouses in Legia Warsaw. Ultimately, it makes sense European clubs like Bordeaux and Torino were sniffing around the striker, as he’s quite mobile for his size, can finish well with both feet, and is clever with his movements inside the box. And say what you will about the Ekstraklasa, it has a strange knack for producing efficient goalscorers, including Niezgoda’s Legia predecessor Nemanja Nikolic.
However, there is a massive catch: Niezgoda has struggled with injuries throughout his career. In a league famous for physical play, and on a team that has experienced its fair share of injury-riddled seasons, Jarek’s fitness is a legitimate concern. While his congenital heart issues seem to be held in check, Legia fans are quick to mention “he's made of glass, and it's hard to keep him in shape for the whole season.” The Timbers’ physio staff will have their work cut out for them to keep Niezgoda on the pitch and scoring goals.
Note: Niezgoda has yet to feature in preseason due to the recovery timeline from a heart ablation procedure during his medical. We likely won’t see him in the XI for the first few weeks of 2020.
Felipe Mora (ST): Niezgoda’s injury-checkered past is an important factor for why Mora’s arrival is such a critical addition. The 26-year-old Chilean seemingly fell into the Timbers lap in a series of fortuitous circumstances, as they acquired him on a TAM loan deal from Pumas in Liga MX. Normally, Mora would be a DP caliber acquisition, and in fact, he was considered a serious target for the final DP slot last year before the club opted for Fernandez. However, after falling out of favor, Pumas were willing to let him go in a manner that accommodated Portland’s limited remaining budget space. Mora provides a divergent style from Niezgoda’s channel-running and Ebobisse’s hold-up ability. He operates on a true poacher’s instinct, and his industrious approach will provide a complementary presence to any of the other strikers.
Dario Župarić (CB): If there’s one offseason acquisition that is more critical to the team's success than the others, Dario Župarić is that guy. Throughout the Timbers MLS history, CB has easily been their most troublesome spot, and they’ve yet to replace Liam Ridgewell’s contributions since his departure last year. Say what you will about Liam’s off-the-field persona: his magnetism, leadership, organizational skills, and distribution were undoubtedly influential to the club’s performance.
Župarić, for lack of a better statement, is essentially the true Ridgewell replacement. At 27-years-old, the Croatian arrives with 90+ matches under his belt at Pescara in Italy and Rijeka in Croatia, a club that has already produced productive MLS players like Héber and Damir Kreilach. Early reports in training regard him as “smooth and confident,” and even if that confidence has gotten the better of him occasionally, those characteristics exemplify why Gio had never received “more messages from friends saying you’ve brought in a very good player.” In the end though, the pressure is on Dario to perform on the pitch. MLS athleticism poses a unique challenge, and there’s little flexibility to compensate for any struggles. His adjustment to MLS must be quick.
Yimmi Chara (RM): Recognize the last name? In a courtship that has lasted as long as the Timbers MLS era itself, Wilkinson finally brought the youngest Chara brother to the Rose City. Acquired as a DP from Atletico Mineiro, there is concern about whether Yimmi’s G+A output will justify the reported $6 million transfer fee. Throughout his career, he’s never been the type of player to light up the scoresheet, but it’s difficult to dispossess him and he provides lightning-quick pace that this roster lacks. With multiple attacking options, I honestly don’t anticipate much pressure to fill the stat sheet, and his familial connection to the organization should facilitate a more seamless transition. Plus, it’s difficult enough for the opposition to face one Chara - it’ll certainly be a pain in the ass to confront two.
Blake Bodily (LM): The HG left-footer is a fairly highly-regarded prospect coming out of the Pac-12, and he showed flashes of quality during his time at T2 a few years ago. With the depth on the wings, I can’t imagine he’ll see much of any first-team minutes. I could be wrong, especially if things go south for any reason, but let’s revisit this signing a year or two from now.

A word on everyone else:

Goalkeepers:
Steve Clark (GK): Without a doubt, Clark was the surprise player of 2019. Boasting the highest save percentage and second-lowest GAA in the league, Clark made numerous highlight-reel saves after taking over for Jeff Attinella in late April. While the occasional mental lapse defined much of his career up to this point, the 33-year-old was nearly flawless in all phases of play last season. However, there’s legitimate concern that this outstanding form is not replicable throughout the next campaign. After Attinella’s regression to the mean following a career year, one can understand why the Front Office might have been apprehensive to give him a sizable pay raise - even if his performances warranted it. That said, Clark’s got the new deal in his pocket and will certainly be the starter opening day vs Minnesota.
Jeff Attinella (GK): As highlighted above, few Timbers had a more ill-fated 2019 campaign than Jeff Attinella. After a torrid 2018 season, Attinella’s performances were marred by poor decision after poor decision until his year concluded with season-ending shoulder surgery. You have to feel for the guy too, as for the first time in his career, he entered an MLS regular season as the unquestioned starter. We’ll see how he recovers from the shoulder injury, but if Clark’s consistency remains and Aljaž Ivačič shows promise, I wouldn’t be shocked if the Timbers move him while he still has some value.
Aljaž Ivačič (GK): If there’s a Timber who had a more disastrous 2019 than Jeff Attinella though, it’s probably Aljaž Ivačič. The 26-year-old Slovenian was acquired last offseason to be the goalkeeper of the future, but a significant leg surgery last February took him out of team activities for most of the year. When he did return with T2 in late summer, things did not look great to say the least. It is undoubtedly difficult to adapt to a new country, but Ivačič’s struggles were worryingly apparent. Most of his goals conceded for T2 looked similar to this, where he was either in the wrong position, extremely hesitant to come off his line, or strikingly late to react to the opponent. These are fundamental issues that can hopefully be chalked up to rust and then addressed with a full preseason. If not, Aljaž might go down as one of the worst signings in club history.
Defenders:
Jorge Moreira (RB): Moreira possesses the talent to be the best RB in the league, but sporadically found himself a liability last season. After years spent with Argentine powerhouse River Plate, the 30-year-old Paraguayan was naturally inclined to push up the pitch since his teams had often dominated the game’s flow. As a result, the Timbers’ conservative style and league’s athleticism caught him off guard, as he had an unfortunate propensity to be out of position early in 2019. However, he mostly adjusted over the course of the year, and his power, crossing ability, and dynamism are crucial to the team.Even with the occasional poor clearance, Moreira is a lockdown starter and few RBs in MLS have his offensive weaponry and pedigree. His loan only lasts until June 30 however, though I’d fully expect the Front Office to lock him down on a permanent deal.
Update: the Timbers right-side defense has been tragic this preseason, and much of that has to do with Moreira’s play. He’ll have to re-adjust or else he’ll revert back to being a liability again
Larrys Mabiala (CB): With his pearly-white smile, cool demeanor, and commanding aerial ability, the big French-Congolese CB is one of the most respected players in the Timbers’ locker room. In a position that is a perennial revolving door of underperforming wreckage, Mabiala has been the one “written-in-ink” starter since mid-2017, and his veteran savvy is integral to the squad’s success. But at age 32, Larrys’ value is not embodied by his individual qualities but more so the partnership he forms with Župarić. His physical presence will always be vital to an otherwise undersized team, however, he lacks the turn of pace and distribution ability that would place him among the elite CBs in MLS. As a result, Larrys and Dario must discover how to paper over each other’s weaknesses by performing to their unique capabilities: Župarić covers ground well and can initiate attacking movements while Mabiala handles physical strikers and cleans up loose balls in the 18. In the end, his consistency will be as influential as any player on the roster. If for any reason he performs below the norm, there is simply not enough quality depth behind him to overcome it.
Bill Tuiloma (CB): Tuiloma is not spectacular by any means, but he’s an ideal player to provide sporadic minutes. The 24-year-old Kiwi is cheap, versatile, and possesses enough technical quality to score the odd banger. It’s a shame a calf injury will rule him out for the next few weeks, as the team could use his flexibility for spot duty at CB, RB, and even defensive midfield. If he recovers fully and Župarić struggles to adapt to the league’s athleticism, expect him to mount a challenge for starting minutes.
Julio Cascante (CB): The Costa Rican CB is best described as a high-ceiling, low-floor player whose ceiling continues to lower year after year. As far as backup CBs go, he’s probably adequate, but the guy went from a fringe national-teamer to virtually off-the-radar since his arrival in Portland. Though his height and build forge a formidable aerial presence, he’s yet to resolve occasional mental lapses and improve his subpar distribution. But Julio’s most maddening characteristic is his inconsistency. Perhaps the best thing you can say about a Cascante performance is that you didn’t notice him. Unfortunately, he tends to stick out for all the wrong reasons. Maybe a little more familiarity with the league will help the 26-year-old raise his level in 2020. I’m not exceedingly hopeful though.
Jorge Villafaña (LB): El Sueño hasn’t been the same player since his departure to Santos Laguna after MLS Cup 2015. Still an excellent crosser, Villafaña really struggled with pacey wingers towards the beginning of the season, although there are some whispers he was often gutting through minor knocks. Even with an uptick of form over the course of the campaign, there is legitimate concern he’s lost a step and will be a liability in the backline. I love the man as much as the next guy, but I’d say the uneasiness is valid. Let’s hope he proves us all wrong.
Marco Farfan (LB): The lack of confidence in Villafaña would be less of an issue if Zarek Valentin were still suiting up in the green-and-gold because Marco Farfan is as fragile as a potato chip. The HG LB is not the most athletic individual, but his technical quality is probably proficient enough to play at this level. Farfan still has to evolve as a 1v1 defender, though he’ll certainly get looks this year if he can manage to stay healthy.
Note: We still need a backup RB. It could be former NYRB, IMFC, and Dynamo player Chris Duvall. 20-year-old Venezuelan Pablo Bonilla is another option, but he’s at T2 for the meantime.
Midfielders:
Diego Valeri (CAM): When all is said and done, I hope MLS fans and media take a moment to appreciate just how good Diego Valeri was. Since 2015, we’ve witnessed impressive names take home the Landon Donovan MVP award including Giovinco, Villa, Josef, and Vela. Sandwiched in between those names you’ll find Diego Valeri. Only the ninth MLS player to reach the elusive 70G, 70A Club, Valeri took the Timbers from a hapless expansion side to a perennial playoff contender. And from my admittedly biased perspective, I don’t think he gets enough credit for doing so. But don’t take it from me, take it from Albert Rusnak, who accurately captures the true essence of the Maestro in this interview. For the miracles performed on the pitch, his importance and presence in the community are just as admirable.
However, times are changing for Valeri, and it’s best exemplified by the fact we almost lost him over a contract dispute this offseason. By taking a TAM deal, Diego not only affirmed his commitment to the organization but allowed them to make moves to best ensure he doesn’t retire with only a single major MLS title to his name. I’d expect the Timbers staff to exercise more load management with him this campaign, but by no means does that change his status as a pillar of the club and community. Build the statue.
Sebastian Blanco (LM/RM): Sebastian Blanco is one of those guys who never seems to score a bad goal. The fiery Argentine may not be the face of the franchise off the pitch, but the decision to extend his DP contract over Valeri is a hint towards Blanco’s importance on the field. After posting his second consecutive double-digit assist campaign, Blanco’s quality across all attacking midfield positions is unquestioned. That said, 2020 is a pivotal season for the Timbers’ oldest Designated Player. Soon to be 32, the clock is ticking on Blanco’s heyday, and he’ll certainly aspire to outperform 2019’s underwhelming tally of six goals from 106 shot attempts. Now surrounded by a wealth of complimentary attacking pieces though, I’d expect a rejuvenated Seba come March. Bet the over on six goals.
Diego Chara (CDM): If there’s anyone who can conquer the inevitability of fathertime, Diego Chara is the guy. Soon to be 34-years-old, Chara’s performance metrics — involving areas such as speed and distance covered — reached all-time highs last year. His importance to the club over the past decade cannot be overstated, and we were all ecstatic to see him finally partake in an MLS All Star Game last season. The Colombian possesses a pillowy first touch, an immense soccer IQ, and a fearless presence in the middle of the park, and there simply will be no replacing him when he finally does choose to retire. But to be honest with you, I think he’s still got a few more Best XI caliber seasons in him. He just ages like a fine wine.
Andrés Flores (CM): Hell, I’m just gonna copy and paste exactly what I wrote last year because it’s still just as applicable. Andres Flores is like a Toyota Camry - solid if unspectacular. He doesn't have the sexy style that will garner all the attention, but when push comes to shove and you need to get from point A to point B, he’ll do the job (at a very low price too!). Look for him to assist in spot-duty once he returns from injury, but his most important contributions will likely be found in the little things off the pitch.
Cristhian Paredes (CM): At only 21 years of age, the full Paraguayan international started over 30 matches the past two seasons and has also emerged as the surefire midfield partner to Diego Chara. After a 2018 campaign that saw a significant adjustment period, Paredes looked far more composed in 2019, adding late-runs into the box into his arsenal midway through last season. However, no longer on loan from Club America, Paredes will face more organizational pressure to be a day-in, day-out starter this campaign. His ranginess and ability to break up play are unquestioned, but he needs to become a bit cleaner on the ball and more confident playing out of tight spaces. That said, there’s a reason the club has invested more capital into the promising midfielder: he has the potential to be a significant contributor for years to come.
Marvin Loría (LM/RM): In the next few seasons, I’d wager Marvin Loría will become the poster child for the Timbers youth development structure. With a comparatively underdeveloped and shallow Homegrown talent pool, Portland picks up guys like Loría out of foreign youth programs to develop through the Timbers pipeline. The 22-year-old Costa Rican international showed significant promise last season, and he can play a true inverted winger role - a unique style in terms of this roster. While he may see time at LM and CAM, I love him cutting in from the right, as he can deliver bangers like this and allow Jorge Moreira to bulldoze forward. At a league minimum salary, Loría provides the cheap and talented depth which makes this attack’s outlook so promising. I can’t wait to see what strides he makes this season (once he returns from an underpublicized/undisclosed injury).
Andy Polo (RM): Not many people in the Timbers fanbase understand why Andy Polo is still on the roster, let alone competing for starting minutes. In 2,860 MLS minutes, the Peruvian winger has only managed a dismal one goal and three assists - a statline that is considerably worse than ineffective wingers of the past including Kalif Alhassan, Sal Zizzo, and Franck Songo’o. He’s not an outright liability, and occasionally puts in a shift defensively, but he essentially exists solely to occupy space. Now entering his third season, Polo’s best string of matches came as the third CM in a 4-3-2-1 just before the 2018 World Cup. He’s since gathered looks in preseason as a #8 in a 4-3-2-1 and showed flashes but is still incomplete. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Tomas Conechny (CF/LM/RM): The 21-year-old Argentine enters the 2020 campaign a relative unknown, and though the club thought enough of him to exercise his full-time purchase option from San Lorenzo, his fit on the squad has yet to be fully discerned. Rumored to be one of the better headers-of-the-ball on the team, he showed occasional creative sparks in late-game situational appearances but has yet to prove he deserves starting minutes. We hear quotes akin to “he doesn’t yet know how good he can be,” but it still isn’t obvious that a particular position suits him well or if he even possesses a skillset that allows him to be a difference-maker at this level. For all intents and purposes, he’s likely to end up Diego Valeri’s understudy even if Conechny has yet to show the same precision and danger at a playmaking second-forward role. As a result, it remains to be seen if the high-rated prospect grows into a significant piece of the puzzle or if his lack of positional clarity ultimately hampers his development.
Dairon Asprilla (RM): Dairon Asprilla plays at an all-star caliber level if one of two things are true: the Timbers are on the verge of postseason elimination or he’s playing on T2. If neither of those two things are true, he’s often more useless than a turn signal on a BMW. Some wonder if he possesses compromising pictures of Wilkinson or MP, otherwise there’s very little to explain why he’s one of the longest-tenured Timbers - especially considering he’s been in-and-out of the doghouse almost every year. Word out of training suggests he’s been one of the best players in camp, but we’ve been down this road before - if it’s not Oct. or Nov., Asprilla often looks lost on the pitch.
Sidenote: 99% of Dairon’s shot attempts get thwarted due to his foolishly long windup, but when he does get a hold of one, they stay hit.
Eryk Williamson (CM): The HG midfielder (by way of D.C.) found starting minutes in spot appearances last fall, and he looked competent if unremarkable. For T2, Williamson often occupied more advanced positions, but I think he projects best as a ball-shuttling #8 in this squad. In particular, I can see him fitting into Andy Polo’s old role as a CM next to Chara and/or Paredes in a 4-3-2-1, as his passing and combination play provide a diverse look from the other two. Overall, Williamson finds himself in a decent situation to get game action this year, and I’m interested to see how he develops and grows in confidence in 2020.
Renzo Zambrano (CDM): Another international brought through the T2 pipeline, Zambrano is essentially Diego Chara’s backup at the #6. Since George Fochive left following the 2015 season, the Timbers have struggled to find a suitable defensive backup in the central midfield. Renzo is now that guy. The 25-year-old Venezuelan appeared in 10 matches last season and struggled immensely in fixtures against Colorado and Atlanta, but showed flashes of positivity in thrashings of Houston and Vancouver. 2020 will require more consistency from Zambrano who doesn’t possess the same physicality or power as Chara - but then again, few do. As a result, if I were Savarese, I’d try to mold Zambrano into a fulcrum/anchor type midfielder in the form of a Uri Rosell or Scott Caldwell. He’s a capable passer, and if he simplifies his game to shield the backline, he’ll be an asset to the team. If not, he’ll likely over-extend himself, and his midfield partner will be forced to work more tirelessly to maintain solid defensive shape. Renzo is likely the first option off the bench whenever Chara or Paredes are unavailable, so his growth is critical to the team’s success this year.
Forwards:
Jeremy Ebobisse (ST): Since Niezgoda and Mora’s arrival, some fans and media have denounced the organization for burying the 23-year-old American on the depth chart and hindering his development. Here’s why I think that’s an overly-sensationalized viewpoint:
  1. As Wilkinson has correctly identified, Ebobisse will miss a good chunk of the early season for Olympic qualification, and with Niezgoda’s injury history, there needs to be other legitimate options to start upfront (i.e. not Dairon Asprilla).
  2. In 2018, Ebobisse entered the season ‘stuck’ behind two DP-type strikers in Fanendo Adi and Samuel Armenteros. Guess who emerged on top? Ebobisse. There will be multiple competitions, two-striker formations, and rotations that allow him to earn quality minutes.
  3. This idea that the organization is almost trying to sabotage his development is an outrageous claim. Ebobisse was the only player on the squad to play in every match last season and only finished behind Chara, Blanco, and Valeri in terms of total minutes played. Granted, he played a fair few matches at LW (not ideal, but he wasn’t outright terrible), but the team did have its best stretch of success with him and Fernandez on the pitch together.
But the one factor people must acknowledge is this: Ebobisse still hasn’t developed the it factor that other MLS strikers have - at least not yet. When Fernandez arrived, his ruthlessness was a stark contrast to Ebobisse’s often less-goal-hungry runs and occasional lack of clarity in the final third. Jeremy is a decent finisher, even with a few missed sitters, but he’s still not consistent enough with the direct runs off the shoulder that separate good from great. He’ll hopefully continue to develop a wider range of skills, but he’s not yet the guy to put this team over the top.
Predicted Starting XI:
Primarily: 4-2-3-1
Other likely options: 4-3-2-1 or 4-4-2
Best Case Scenario:
A top playoff seed and a challenge for either the Supporter’s Shield or MLS Cup. Savarese effectively implements tactical flexibility, Niezgoda and Mora combine for 20+ goals, and Cristhian Paredes takes the next step forward in his development. While Župarić locks down the defense, one of Valeri or Blanco mounts a Best XI campaign, and Diego Chara makes a second consecutive All-Star Game appearance. Sprinkle in a Cascadia Cup alongside a harmonious relationship between the Front Office and Timbers Army, and you have a damn successful year.
Worst Case Scenario:
Pretty much the opposite of what you see above. Niezgoda can’t stay healthy while the core pieces’ form collectively falls off a cliff. Those in the Army who hold a personal vendetta against Merritt Paulson blow a trivial issue out of proportion causing a full-on revolt from the supporter’s group. Savarese proves to be an average coach with exploitable flaws, and the team fails to qualify for the playoffs in a competitive Western Conference. Significant spending, no tangible results. A wasted year.
Realistic Scenario:
Well, either of those two scenarios could qualify as realistic. But like all Timbers seasons, it’s most realistic to be somewhere in between. There’ll be stretches of outright panic, and there’ll be other times where we all convince ourselves the Timbers will win MLS Cup. Some of the signings hit: let’s go with Župarić - while other signings underwhelm due to extenuating circumstances: probably Niezgoda (and his glass skeleton). The team finishes in the middle of the pack - a team that no one wants to face in October - but one that is equally liable to beat themselves.
Prediction:
Even for someone as pessimistic as I am, I won’t predict the worst-case scenario. Nevertheless, I can’t shake the discouraging feeling that the Timbers will squander its immense talent again. A disappointing 6th or 7th place finish is in store after another taxing roller-coaster season. However, I’ll go out on a limb to say Portland does win a Cascadia Cup or USOC - some sort of silverware that convinces everybody the obvious flaws can be overcome in 2021. Blanco has a great 2020 season. The other pieces show flashes brilliance, yet can’t quite string together enough consistency to let the attack fire on all cylinders. Savarese will keep his job but enters the 2021 campaign on the hotseat. It’ll be another case of “close, but not close enough.”

Online Resources

Official Links: Website | Twitter
Local Coverage: Oregon Live | Stumptown Footy
Best Twitter follow: Chris Rifer
Best Read: Jamie Goldberg’s article on Fernandez didn’t age well, but it’s extremely important to understand his tragic life story.
Subreddit: timbers

#RCTID

submitted by NewRCTID22 to MLS [link] [comments]

Defending the Draft 2020: Las Vegas Raiders

Season Review
The final season of the Oakland Raiders and the second in Jon Gruden’s second tenure had a small dose of optimism. After a paltry 4 win season in 2018 the Raiders brought in NFL Network analyst Mike Mayock to be the new General Manager. While few of the free agents that the Raiders brought in were able to make a major impact, save Richie Incognito at Left Guard and Trent Brown at Right Tackle, many of the rookies brought in did. Josh Jacobs, Trayvon Mullen, Maxx Crosby, Hunter Renfrow, Foster Moreau, and Clelin Ferrell all saw significant snaps. Johnathan Abram was on his way to having a starter role but was lost for the season on week 1 due to a torn rotator cuff and labrum. There was also this whole Antonio Brown thing going on. I think it's safe to say that I don’t need to get into the details on that. However, Carr losing the best wide receiver he would have ever had to play with and whom a big chunk of the playbook was geared towards was a mighty bow to the Raiders offense.
When the schedule was released there was no question that the front half was brutal with 5 weeks straight of non-home games (4 away and 1 London). The optimism of a playoff berth in the Raiders final season in Oakland only grew when they made it through that stretch going into week 12 at 6-4. Sadly, that’s when the lack of depth and quality weapons started to rear its ugly head and the Raiders went on to win only 1 of their final 6 games including a dismal 4 game losing streak which had the Raiders getting blown out by the Jets, Chiefs, and Titans. In that stretch the Raiders managed to lose in the final game at the Oakland Coliseum to the Jacksonville Jaguars. Not Great. However, they managed to split the last two games of the year, ending the season at 7-9 and in 3rd place in the AFC West.
Notable Pre-Draft Acquisitions
Corey Littleton, LB, LAR (3 years, $35.25m, $22m G)
PFF Grade - 78.9 (8th of 89)
To say that the Raiders have had a dearth of talent at linebacker over the past decade is an understatement. Such names like Perry Riley, Nick Roach and Will Compton have seemed like upgrades for our team. Not very inspiring. Mayock and Gruden clearly wanted to focus on improving this position and attacked the best linebacker on the market in Littleton. The Raiders have been victimized by tight ends and pass catching running backs and having an athletic coverage specialist like Littleton will only help the Raiders defense.
Carl Nassib, DE, TB (3 years, $25.25m,$16.75m G)
PFF Grade - 69.3 (43rd of 106)
Even with the additions of Clelin Ferrell and Maxx Crosby in the 2019 draft the Raiders had a need at defensive end. Nassib gives the Raiders another long and high motor rusher who can hold the edge. Nassib may not be a high end player, but he’s going to be a valuable piece on the defensive line.
Nick Kwiatkoski, LB, CHI (3 years, $21m, $13.75m G)
PFF Grade - 72.6 (15th of 89)
The Raiders doubled down with linebackers by adding Kwiatkoski to pair with Littleton. The Raiders have since said that they are going to have Kwiatkoski wear the green dot on defense and playing MIKE. Kwiat may be lacking in starting experience but the Raiders are betting on his upside after showing out for Chicago this past season. The former Bear LB showed good coverage drops in conjunction with intelligence and physicality and should be a nice partner to Littleton.
Marcus Mariota, QB, TEN (2 years, $17.6m, $7.5m G)
PFF Grade - 64.3 (27th of 37)
It's no mystery that Raider Nation has a love/hate relationship with Derek Carr. While Carr is the unquestioned starter, Mariota will be there in case Carr is unable to play up to the standards of Gruden. Mariota still has good mobility for the position but the Raiders have been vocal about wanting to get him healthy first and foremost.
Maliek Collins, DL, DAL (1 year, $6m, $5.75m G)
PFF Grade - 65.1 (65th of 115)
One interesting move made by the Raiders this offseason was the hiring of Rod Marinelli (and letting go of Bretson Buckner). Marinelli made his influence and presence known with two signings, the first of which was for Maliek Collins (the other being Jeff Heath but I’m not gonna devote a ton of time to a backup safety/ST player). Collins is a solid interior pass rusher who still has his best years ahead of him. Jon Hankins is locked into our starting 1T role but the 3T is up for grabs between Collins and Mo Hurst, who ended 2019 very strongly.
Jason Witten, TE, DAL (1 year, $4m, $3.5m G)
PFF Grade - 59.4 (43rd of 67)
Yes yes. Of course a Jon Gruden-led team spent $4m on a possible TE2. Overpay aside, Witten gives Carr another red zone threat and the Raiders TE room a role model professional again. It’s only a 1 year deal so this deal won’t be too impactful but anytime you can sign a former Monday Night Football broadcaster you gotta do it right?
Damarious Randall, S, CLE (1 year, $1.5m, $1.5m G)
PFF Grade - 69.3 (40th of 88)
The Raiders secondary was not good in 2019. They attempted to fix this by signing Byron Jones but Miami got him for more guaranteed money. They tried for Chris Harris Jr but he liked the fit of the Chargers deal. They even agreed to terms with Eli Apple but that fell apart due to medical issues. Once that happened they used some of that money to bring in Randall, who will compete with Erik Harris to play FS.
Major Needs Entering Draft
The Raiders entered draft day with 2 major needs, wide receiver and cornerback. They also needed depth all over the defense, especially at running back and linebacker. There was continuing talk of quarterback but despite the signing of Mariota there were still rumblings of a Jalen Hurts or Jordan Love selection.
Las Vegas Raiders 2020 Draft
Round 1 (12th Overall) - Henry Ruggs III, WR, Alabama
5-11, 185lbs ---- Junior ---- PFF Grade: 75.0
Team Fit: Wide receiver was the clear need for the Las Vegas Raiders coming into draft night. With their pick of the top 3 wide outs in the class they went for the one with the best athletic profile and that was Henry Rugs III. Ruggs should be able to start very quickly for the Raiders and gives Derek Carr an explosive weapon who can win in numerous ways. Mayock also brought up how Ruggs could possibly return kicks and use that 4.27 speed to flip the field in special teams. There were some rumors about the Raiders moving back with Tampa here but were pretty locked in on Ruggs. I’d assume they didn’t want to risk San Francisco getting yet another target in consecutive drafts (2018 was McGlinchey and 2019 was Bosa).
Vic Analysis: Ruggs came into draft day as my 15th overall player and WR4. I had a firm round 1 grade on him as well. It is no secret to say that Ruggs has an elite trump card in his speed and is able to use that speed both deep down the field and in his after the catch ability. Ruggs isn’t the typical speed target with bad hands either. His 10 1/8th” mitts show up on tape and he uses them to make catches outside his body despite his smaller size. The Raiders should make it a habit to get the ball in Ruggs’ hands as often as possible because his speed will stretch defenses both vertically and horizontally. The Raiders have a true #1 target in Darren Waller and a good slot in Hunter Renfrow, meaning Ruggs doesn’t need to put up gawdy stats in order to be influential or valuable. Just by being on the field he will open up things underneath for our other targets. Mayock and Gruden have both raved about Ruggs' work ethic and football intelligence. Ruggs does need to try and improve on his physicality while in his routes and at the catch point but at his size that’s not an easy task. However, with Ruggs combination of athleticism, ball skills, route running, football IQ, and fearlessness he should be a staple in the offense of the Las Vegas Raiders.
Round 1 (19th Overall) - Damon Arnette, CB, Ohio State
6-0, 195lbs ---- Redshirt Senior ----PFF Grade: 75.0
Team Fit: If wide receiver was the biggest need for the Raiders, second place would be cornerback. It was heavily rumored that the Raiders were interested in taking Clemson’s A.J. Terrell at 19 but when Atlanta scooped him up the Raiders went to the next guy on their board in Ohio State’s Damon Arnette. It didn't sound like there was much interest from other teams to move up to 19 so the Raiders stuck with their guns and picked up Arnette. Just like Clelin Ferrell in 2019, the higher than anticipated draft slot will shadow these guys throughout their rookie contracts. If they perform as the Raiders expect it won’t matter but that remains to be seen.
Vic Analysis: Arnette was my CB8 with a round 2 grade. Arnette may lack ideal length but he is an adept press corner and that makes him an ideal fit for Guenther’s defense. The former Buckeye is able to disrupt routes at the line of scrimmage by being physical and aggressive. He is highly experienced and technically sound as one would expect from a senior in an Ohio State secondary. Arnette has buttery hips that flip with ease and his feet are super quick as well, leaving him able to turn and run with receivers throughout their route. Arnette hasn’t had great ball production but he flashes the ability to make plays on the ball by anticipating the receiver and attacking the catch point even with his back to the ball. Arnette may have tested poorly in his 40 time (4.56)at the Combine, but he plays much faster on film and in my opinion his athletic profile is a plus, not a minus.
Round 3 (80th Overall) - Lynn Bowden Jr, RB, Kentucky
5-11, 204lbs ---- Junior ---- PFF Grade: 73.0
Team Fit: Raiders’ leadership has made it clear that they wanted to increase the number of weapons at Derek Carr’s disposal. Lynn Bowden Jr gives the Raiders QB a versatile weapon who projects best as an offensive chess piece, called a Joker in Gruden’s offense. Bowden can back up Jacobs at RB, jump into the slot at WR, and return punts as well. Bowen has overcome a tough upbringing, is gritty as hell, and still has a chip on his shoulder, making him an ideal Raider. Mayock has said that the Raiders are going to train Bowden, “..to be a running back. If he’s able to handle that job, then we’ll be able to do some other things with him. We’ll move him around, let him catch the football and return punts.”
Vic Analysis: Bowden was definitely a fun study. Despite spending much of the season playing wildcat QB after multiple QB injuries, Bowden ended up as my WR17 (RB8 if I put him with the RBs) with a round 3 grade. Bowden is a tough as nails player who thrives with the ball in his hands. As a runner he mixes his solid field vision with a willingness to run with both power and elusiveness. As a receiver he showcases good hands and the traits needed to improve as a route runner. He still requires some work releasing against press coverage and breaking free downfield against tight coverage. While Bowden has had some experience rushing from the backfield, that’s still going to need some development being a running back and not the QB. I expect that year 1 will be more schemed touches and that added development will give him a more defined role in the Raiders offense.
Round 3 (81st Overall) - Bryan Edwards, WR, South Carolina
6-3, 215lbs ---- Senior ----PFF Grade: 77.9
Team Fit: Did you know that the Raiders really, really wanted to improve their weapons? If you didn’t before it should be obvious now. So far, the Raiders have added a speedster in Ruggs, a do-it-all weapon in Bowden and now the big body possession receiver in Bryan Edwards. Edwards will probably start the year as the Raiders WR4, behind Ruggs, Tyrell Williams, and Hunter Renfrow. I suspect in year 2 he’ll end up being our X receiver taking over for Tyrell.
Vic Analysis: Bryan Edwards graded out as my WR15 and a 3rd Round Grade. Edwards is a big bodied receiver who thrives over the middle of the field. He needs to improve the consistency in his hands catching, but he flashes the ability to do so. Edwards is physical and sneakily elusive with the ball in his hands. He has the explosiveness and long speed to win deep and the route running to win closer to the line of scrimmage as well. He’ll need to shore up his releases against press coverage but he certainly has the requisite tools in his toolbox to do so. He had to battle some awful quarterback play while at South Carolina and going from the likes of Jake Bentley to Derek Carr should help him continue to improve and be a contributor to the Las Vegas offense.
Round 3 (100th Overall) - Tanner Muse, LB, Clemson
6-2, 227lbs ---- Redshirt Senior ---- PFF Grade: 83.0
Team Fit: Even with the signings of Corey Littleton and Nick Kwiatkoski the Raiders wanted to improve their linebacker room. After trading back from 91 they targeted a hybrid player from their favorite school, Clemson. Muse will start out playing special teams for Rich Bisaccia while growing and learning both MIKE and WILL linebacker. Muse fits the Raiders blueprint of a tough, fast athlete with high football and non-football character. Already good friends with Clelin Ferrell, Muse could end up being the third Clemson starter on defense come 2022.
Vic Analysis: I had Tanner Muse graded as a safety and it wasn’t great. He was S17 with a Late Day 3 Grade. Muse was at his best attacking downhill, shedding and avoiding blocks, and not having to do too much diagnosing. I’m not sure Muse will have the ability to keep up with shiftier backs or tight ends, but the potential is there for him to be a solid man coverage player. Worst case he can still blitz and be an early down contributor along with his special teams work. Are there players I would have preferred at 100? Sure are, but Muse fits the Raiders blueprint and with two locked in starters at linebacker getting a developmental player isn’t a bad move. It just might have been early and like with Arnette, if Muse performs his draft slot won’t matter too much.
Round 4 (109th Overall) - John Simpson, OG, Clemson
6-4, 321lbs ---- Senior ---- PFF Grade: 70.2
Team Fit: Remember how I said Mayock and Gruden love Clemson players? Well here’s another one to add into the mix. The Raiders were surprised to see Simpson on the board come Day 3 and made a trade up to come and get their guy. With Richie Incognito getting up there in age and Gabe Jackson dealing with both injuries and underperformance (while having a cap hit close to $10m) the Raiders made it a priority to find someone to take over if they wanted to move on from either. There have been rumors the Raiders had Jackson on the trade block but couldn’t get any takers so he’s graduated to becoming a potential cap casualty. If that’s the case Simpson would compete with Denzelle Good at RG. Worst case I think he backs up Incognito before ultimately taking over at LG for the 37 year old veteran.
Vic Analysis: Simpson was my iOL10 (OG5) and had a 3rd round grade. Simpson is a big, thicc boi. The former Clemson Tiger thrives using his strength while in a phone booth. Simpson has elite length and hand strength, meaning once he gets hands on defenders he is generally taking them wherever he wants them to go. He lacks ideal foot quickness but masks it with decent vision and awareness. Simpson has an elite anchor but needs to make sure he doesn’t jeopardize it with getting too upright and risking his leverage. Simpson is a great fit for the Raiders west coast offense with a mix of gap/zone rushing concepts
Round 4 (139th Overall) - Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech
5-9, 180lbs ---- Junior ---- PFF Grade: 90.3
Team Fit: It was borderline assumed at this point that the Raiders would trade back from 139, what with them not having any picks in the 5th, 6th, or 7th rounds. Instead, they stood pat here and selected the meanest, most fearless nickel corner they could find in Amik Robertson. Currently, LaMarcus Joyner is set to man the slot for the Raiders and if last year is any indication that isn’t the best plan. So, for insurance they went and got potentially the best slot corner in the draft in Amik Robertson. I think it's entirely possible that Amik ends up taking Joyners snaps bit by bit before starting in 2021.
Vic Analysis: Amik Robertson finished up as my CB9 with a round 2 grade. It might be safe to say that If Amik was a few inches taller that he would have gone earlier than that. Robertson plays cornerback like opposing players wanted to take his lunch money. Despite his size Robertson is able to win with physicality, instincts, and ball skills. His ability in short areas is sublime and while he can get over aggressive at times he is usually balanced covering double moves. Obviously he is going to get outmatched sometimes against bigger slot receivers but Amik will make them earn their wins.
Note: Mayock has said one of the reasons he was comfortable not having late day 3 picks was due to the shutdown related to COVID-19. With a shortened camp season he wanted to target players who would no question make the team over taking players who would be long shots.
Post Draft Acquisitions (as of 5.21)
Prince Amukamara (1 year, $1.05m, 50k G)
PFF Grade - 67.4 (43rd of 112)
Even with the Arnette and Amik draft picks, the Raiders had wanted to bring in a veteran corner who could compete with the young defensive backs on the roster for a starting role. Amukamara is a steady type who hasn’t had a ton of ball production but can get the job done in coverage. As of now he would probably be a starter with Trayvon Mullen but if Arnette shows why the Raiders picked him at 19 that could change quickly.
DeVontae Booker, RB, Denver (1 year, $1.0475m, $50k G)
PFF Grade - 65.8 (Not enough snaps to qualify)
Booker gives the Raiders another veteran back to compete in camp. He’s sturdy and good in pass protection so he might make the roster as RB4 behind Jacobs, Richard, and Bowden.
Notable Undrafted Free Agents
Dominik Eberle, K, Utah State
Camp competiton for invumbent Daniel Carlson. Eberle didn't miss an extra point in college, finished with a career percentage of 79.0, and handled kick off duties for the Aggies.
Javin White, LB, UNLV
White is a hybrid defender who profiles best as a nickel linebacker and special teams player. If he's able to get ST reps he could make the back end of the roster while developing a true defensive home. Could see a path to playing time similarly to Corey Littleton.
Kamaal Seymour, OT, Rutgers
4 year starter at a mighty Rutgers (for you Looch) program who profiles better on the inside then at right tackle. The Raiders brought in a ton of options at the interior so it will be a battle for Seymour to make the roster. Practice squad candidate.
Nick Bowers, TE, Penn State
Bowers has good size and athleticism for the position. He was possible 2021 1st round pick Pat Freirmuth's backup but dealt with health the majority of his time in Happy Valley. The Raiders have a deep tight end room so it will be tough for him to make the roster but he could be a practice squad candidate.
Madre Harper, CB, Southern Illinois
Strong athlete with press man traits. Needs to improve his transitions and tweak some technical details but could make the roster and see some time as a special teams player while growing at corner.
Siaosi Mariner, WR, Utah State
Jordan Love's go-to receiver in 2019, Mariner shows some decent traits at the receiver position to go with his 6-2, 205lbs frame. The top of the Raiders wide receiver depth chart is mostly set so Mariner is likely to compete for a practice squad spot. Mariner would be competing against Ateman, Doss, Gafford, Zay Jones, XFL Great De'Mornay Pierson-El and Anthony Ratliff-Williams for the final roster spot.
Mike Panasiuk, DL, Michigan State
Strong as an ox with a body made for taking blocks as a two gap defender, Panasiuk has a chance to make the roster backing up Jon Hankins at 1T. Needs to improve his pass rush but I think the traits are there for him to do so.
Liam McCullough, LS, Ohio State
He's a long snapper. He snaps the ball a long ways. He will compete with current long snapper Trent Sieg.
Conclusion
The Raiders entered the off-season with major needs at wide receiver, linebacker, and cornerback. I believe they addressed two of those, wide receiver and linebacker, strongly while still needing some development for our corner room. Mayock also made sure to improve our depth all around the roster. If Derek Carr is able to continue his upwards trend in year 3 with Jon Gruden, and the pass defense improves literally at all, then the Raiders could compete for a wild card spot. Like last year they will need to survive a tough opening slate, but this time they will need to keep their momentum and not falter down the stretch. The AFC West will be a battle however as each team has made significant improvements. You could make an arguement for each of Denver, LA, or Vegas to come in 2nd, 3rd, or 4th.
2020 Draft Grade: B -
While the Raiders had some slight reaches, and not so slight (*cough*Tanner Muse*cough*), they also found some good values especially on day 2 with Bryan Edwards, John Simpson, and Amik Robertson. I think an aggressive projection has the Raiders with 4 players getting starter reps by the end of the season. More likely, I think Ruggs and Arentte start in 2020 and we see Edwards, Simpson and Amik each get more and more involved in 2021. Bowden will likely be a change of pace weapon throughout his rookie contract and Muse a special teams ace with some improved defensive playing time by 2022.
2020 Prediction: 8-8 (3rd in AFC West)
submitted by vicsage83 to vicscout [link] [comments]

Lets Compile A List Of AFL Player Archetypes!

One of the greatest things about AFL Football in my opinion has always been the amount of different styles an individual player can play. Whether they are short, tall, strong, quick, athletic, crafty and all the rest there is a way each player can contribute and the role they can play can differ tremendously.
This made me decide to make a post that I was thinking about for a while and was hoping people would be able to help with. Moving away from the traditional positions of defenders, midfielders and forwards I want to know if we can collectively make a list of different player archetypes. This is more specific styles of play and correlations with player.

DEFENDER ARCHETYPES:

Lockdown Defenders: (suggested by Maximumlnsanity)
These players are characterised for their ability to shut down an opposition forward without winning too much possession. These players often feature more in the stat sheet for 1%ers and spoils as opposed to marks. They don’t particularly win the ball but more play a nullifying role. The stats may not showing but these players are imperative to their teams structure. An example of such players include Neville Jetta and Nick Smith
Intercept Defenders: (suggested by Maximumlnsanity)
These players are characterised by for their ability read the play much better than all other players and intercept the play. The often don't exactly have a direct opponent that they out play on the day but instead play as more of a loose extra in the backline. They are often tall in height as well. Not surprisingly these players stand out for their ability to leap high and maintain a strong grip of the ball. An example of such players include Jeremy McGovern, Allir Aliir, Majak Daw and Luke Ryan.
Rebounding Defenders: (suggested by PureWise)
These players are characterised by their ability to win the ball at halfback and provide a damaging run that breaks the game open. As well as strong pace these players are also renowned for good kicking skills and don't handball very frequently. They generally are at the top of the league for bounces and metres gained. An example of such players include Jason Johannisen, Paul Seedsman and Adam Saad.
The "Quarterback" or Defensive General: (suggested by PureWise)
These players are characterised by their ability to lead a team while personify all the traits you would want from a captain. They are fearless and gutsy while also having a strong football IQ. They control the flow of the game and often are very composed with ball in hand. Often the captain of a squad or at the very least part of the leadership team there are a lot of player that fit this category. These include: Luke Hodge, Jarryd McVeigh, Shannon Hurn and Brendon Goddard.
Old School Fullbacks (suggested by Denz292)
These players are characterised for their ability to shut down an opposition forward without winning too much possession. These players often feature more in the stat sheet for 1%ers and spoils as opposed to marks. Opposed to lockdown defenders these players usually rely on physical strength and positioning and are generally speaking taller. Their nullifying role is incredibly vital to team success, additionally these players rarely get on the score board, often being the on the last line of defence. An example of such players include Joel Hamling, Darren Glass and Daniel Talia.

MIDFIELDER ARCHETYPES:

Big body midfielders These players are characterised by their strong ability to win contested possessions and surge the ball forwards. They always dominate centre clearances and are also terrific 1v1 marks. Their kicking isn’t elite, but they are extremely valuable to their teams success. An example of such players include Patrick Cripps, Ben Cunnington, Nat Fyfe.
Explosive midfielders These players are characterised by their strong ability to run all day, win contested possessions while still being able to deliver outside run, are terrific kicks, can burst through a contest at will and are very capable of kicking a tough goal. These players are generally strong around their core powering their explosive first step. An example of such players include Gary Ablett and Chris Judd
Smooth moving midfielders These players are characterised by their strong ability to provide a drive for their team and generally have high numbers in uncontested possessions. They aren’t particularly renowned for their goal kicking but are known to have a long and accurate kick with their accurate disposal a common highlight. These players are generally at the top of the list by the end of the game for metres gained and kilometres run. An example of such players include Andrew Gaff, Tom Scully, Josh Kelly
Line Breaking Midfielders (suggested by Hendo8888) with a great explanation by Hendo8888
These players are characterised by their strong ability to provide a drive for their team from defence and generally have high numbers in uncontested possessions. They will often receive the ball on the wing or half back flank to spark counterattacks to run and carry. These players, unsurprisingly, are often quick with good kicking skills and tend to feature high in metres gained and bounces. A distinct difference between this role to the rebounding defender is they usually play more on the wing or further up the ground. An example of such players include Lachie Whitfield, Brodie Smith and Jared Polec.
"non impactful"/s Midfielders (suggested by hungryorange)
These players are characterised by their strong ability to win the ball in tough situations, particularly contested possessions. They are often at the bottom of a pack trying to win the hard ball and when they do they are often handball out of the back to a teammate who then surges the ball forward. These players typically finish with very high handball numbers and do not feature highly in metres gained or inside 50s. They are amazing players in terms of accumulating stats and are specifically good in fantasy and supercoach leagues but cop a lot of slack for their poor disposal. Additionally their lack of scoreboard presence in addition to this also leads them often, unfairly, being labelled not impactful.
An example of such players include Lachie Neale, Matt Priddis and Tom Mitchell.

RUCKMAN ARCHETYPES:

Lumbering Ruckman (suggested by Maximumlnsanity) with category name suggested by PointOfFingers
These players are characterised by their ability to play a valuable role as a ruckman who takes strong marks down the line and is solid in the hit outs department. These players aren't particularly clean with their disposal nor are they agile but their role is a big part of most teams 'spine.' They generally don't get enough recognition for their style of play as it rarely produces highlights or note worthy plays but it is a part of all good squads. An example of such players include Matthew Kreuzer, Toby Nankervis and Ben McEvoy.
"4th Midfielder" Ruckman (suggested by Maximumlnsanity)
These players are characterised by their ability to play a valuable role as a runner and additional skilled ball user. They are generally tall ruck man with supreme agility and ball winning abilities. They are also known for the ability to provide strong pressure and essential play exactly how many inside midfielders would. These ruckman stand out from many others largely due to the quality of their disposal and confidence to take the game on. An example of such players include Brodie Grundy, Nic Naitanui and Dean Cox.
Tap Ruckman (suggested by Maximumlnsanity) These players are characterised by their ability to provide their midfielders with first use of the footy with supreme ability at directing hitouts. These players can turn a game on its head with strong play and finding an elite tap ruckman can set teams up for long term success. These players will often find them selves as the bail out option for a kick down the line or in defence intercepting a play. They aren't know for their goal kicking but are capable of converting a set shot when required. They also have a high handball to kick ratio. An example of such players include Max Gawn, Sam Jacobs and Aaron Sandilands.
Relief/Forward Pressing Ruckman (suggested by Southern__Lights) These players are characterised by their ability to exceed their role as a traditional ruckman and push forward to make their opponent accountable. They are terrific in 1v1 contests due to their elite marking ability. They often split their time in the ruck and forward line, pushing deep into the goal score when the team full forward is off resting. An example of such players include Nathan Vardy and Callum Sinclair.

FORWARD ARCHETYPES:

Aerobically gifted forwards These players are characterised by their ability to cover the ground through out a match and run a tremendous amount. While these players are more renowned for their goal kicking they are elite at marking and get to all the right positions all game. They are the type of player that can turn a game on its head. An example of such players include Matthew Richardson and Nick Riewoldt (more so towards the end of their careers)
Mini excitement machines These players are characterised by for their highlight plays and are usually small forwards. They are known for an amazing ability to pull down a high flying mark. They are also particularly crafty always finding unique ways to score and also tend to produce exciting runs include chase down holding the ball tackles. An example of such players include Anthony McDonald Tippingwuti, Liam Ryan and Cyril Rioli
Pressure Forwards: (suggested by Beamslocke)
These players are characterised by their ability to constantly apply pressure in the forward line and play a selfless but crucial role in the teams forward structure. They are generally smaller players who often rank highly in goal assists and tackles. Of course they also kick a lot of goals but their game and value to a team far exceeds just that. They are also different to "mini excitement machines" as they do more of the grunt work that goes un noticed. An example of such players include Dan Butler, Jamie Cripps and Paul Puopolo.
Roaming Half Forwards (suggested by Maximumlnsanity) with a great explanation by duffercoat
These players are characterised by their ability to play as a scoring option but also press up the ground a little more in a sort of link up role. These players are generally tall forwards but utilise their creativity and athleticism to provide a dangerous match up for opposition players by drawing away from their preferred position. These players are great in the air and hard to stop once they some separation from their opponent. They are also very long kicks of the footy making their far shots on goal exciting to watch. An example of such players include Eric Hipwood, Joe Daniher and Lance Franklin.
Old School Full Forwards (suggested by Count_Critic) These players are characterised by their ability to outmuscle a defender with supreme 1 on 1 strength in a contest. They are elite in contested marking and often kick their goals from set shots. Although dying out in recent times they are still capable of breaking a game open when given appropriate delivery inside 50 and can take advantage of mismatches. An example of such players include Tom Hawkins, Jason Dunstall and Tony Lockett.
Leading Forwards (suggested by _GORDONN_ ) with a great explanation by _GORDONN_
These players are characterised by their ability to use their speed and agility to lose their defender and take solid marks on the lead. A metre of separation is often enough for them to be able to have enough space to have a mark a sure thing. These players are noted for their accuracy in their set shots and score a vast majority of their goals from this source. An example of such players include Ben Brown, Matthew Lloyd and Jesse Hogan.
Goal Sneaks (suggested by _GORDONN_ ) with a great explanation by _GORDONN)
These players are characterised by their ability to kick a goal out of nowhere. They don’t quite have the leaping ability of the “mini excitement machines” but don’t necessarily put on as much pressure as “pressure forwards.” These players don’t need a lot of the footy to have an impact on a game and their footy smarts and quick thinking often set them into good scoring chances. A lot of the goals kicked by these players include snaps and dribble kicks with many efforts from the boundary or within 30 metres of goal. An example of such players include Eddie Betts, Stephen Milne and Tom Papley.
Defensive Forwards (suggested by snootysnob) These players are characterised by their ability to neutralise a teams opposition defender. They often don't get on the scoreboard but are in the forward line in order to draw a matchup of a strong defender. Usually this player they attempt to lock down is the teams rebounding defender so that they can lock the ball inside their forward 50 for as long as possible. An example of such players include Chris Mayne, George Hewett and Tom Bugg.

OTHER ARCHETYPES:

Swingman: (suggested by Nixilaas)
These players are characterised by their ability to hold down a key position as both a forward and a defender. These players often have great marking abilities and are relatively tall making them a difficult match up on both sides of the ball. Their versatility is also important to help them play as an extra in defence or attack and draw an extra opposition player to free up space for their opponent. An example of such players include Harry Taylor and Cale Hooker.
Taggers (suggested by dignan_
These players are characterised by their ability to limit the influence of an elite midfielder on an opposition team. They are often viewed as pests and annoying and will often play a very tight line as to what is and isn’t allowed. They don’t always have high disposal numbers themselves and play a sacrificial team role. Elite taggers where once regarded as one of the most valued commodities but have started to become less common. An example of such players include Ryan Crowley, Ben Jacobs and Cameron Ling.
Utilities (suggested by jamesg15555)
These players are characterised by their ability to cover a tone of positions on the ground having an influence in the backline, midfield and forward line. These players are often strong runners and have good marking ability while being above average in heigh. They are also relatively quick allowing them to match up against all players well. They can kick goals and are able to adjust to a coaches needs midgame depending on the situation. An example of such players include Adam Goodes, Justin Westhoff and Jack Gunston.
Grunt Work Players (suggested by Denz292) with a great explanation by Denz292
These players are characterised by their ability to not really hold down a set specific position and instead play more of an all around time role. They don't feature high in the stats but often play as a mix between a tagger and a defensive minded player. These players feature highly in stats such as tackles, smothers, shepherds, spoils and bumps. It might not be the best archetype due to its lack of defined role but it is still an important player type. An example of such players include Daniel Chick and Campbell Brown
submitted by NitroXYZ to AFL [link] [comments]

Countdown to Kickoff 2019: Portland Timbers

Countdown to Kickoff 2019: Portland Timbers

Basic Info:

Club Name: Portland Timbers
Location: Portland, Oregon
Stadium: Providence Park. Currently undergoing privately-funded renovations until 6/1.
Head Coach: Giovanni Savarese (2nd year)
Captain: Diego Valeri
Owner: Peregrine Sports, LLC
CEO/Majority Owner: Merritt Paulson
USL Affiliate: Timbers 2
Kits:

2018 in Review

Final Standings: 15-10-9 (W-L-D), 54 pts, +5 GD, 5th in the West
If you were living under a rock and wanted to know what occurred during the 2018 Portland Timbers Season, look no further than the 3-2 victory of Sporting KC in the Western Conference Finals 2nd leg. In so many ways, this match was a microcosm of the season as whole. At times, the Timbers were dull, uninspiring, and sometimes hapless, and at other points, you’d see moments of sheer brilliance from some of the league’s brightest superstars. For stretches of the season, the team would appear rock solid and tough to break down, reeling off 15 unbeaten from from April 14 - August 4. However, that stretch would be bookended by 5 games winless and 4 games winless at the start and end of the season, respectively. And just as hopes for a successful playoff push began to slip after a dreary nil-nil performance against FC Dallas in late September, the Green-and-Gold rattled off two blowout wins against RSL to secure their first ever even-year playoff berth.
With this newly-(re)acquired confidence, the 10-man Timbers escaped a knockout round match in Dallas on the back of a Diego Valeri brace, setting up a heavyweight showdown with Seattle in the WC Semifinals. The first leg ended 2-1 in favor of the Rose City, but this match, while fairly entertaining, would be overshadowed by the pure, unrefined, 8-ball of MLS-yness that the 2nd leg served up. The match, which was originally scheduled for the following Sunday, was moved to a Thursday night due to the Seattle International Car Show. The first half though? Completely unforgettable. The second half and extra time? I could go on for this whole preview. For the sake of brevity, I encourage you to sample some it for yourself.
As Sam Stejskal stated, the “Wildest, craziest, worst, best, most MLS game of all-time and it finished at damn near 2 am ET on a Friday morning because of the Seattle International Car Show. Never forget.” Valium wasn’t enough.
A few weeks later, we hit the aforementioned 2nd leg match-up at Sporting Kansas City. As Blanco rifled home an an absolute corker, and Valeri converted two sucker punches, it was suddenly clear this underdog, scrappy, and mercurial side was on its way to MLS Cup. Ultimately, the challenge against Atlanta United proved to be too much, as the Timbers succumbed to the Five Stripes 2-0, but getting there was well worth the ride.
In the end, the 2018 Timbers were a paradox. Almost always an underdog, but possessed three of the best players in the league. Lucky to be in the final, but still deserving at the same time. Nevertheless, 2018, even though it didn’t finish the way we all had hoped, will always be a cherished season in the Rose City.

The Coach

The credit goes to now 2nd year manager Giovanni Savarese, who I view as embodiment of the organization as a whole. He might not have the biggest name in global soccer, but he’s got a chip on his shoulder, is extremely passionate for the sport, and wants to throw his weight around with the big boys in the league.
The former Venezuelan int’l tinkered with the lineup throughout the season, as he started with a 4-2-3-1 press, mixed in a 5-4-1 and 4-3-2-1, before returning back to the 4-2-3-1 during the playoff push. His ultra-pragmatic style ruffled a few feathers in the Timbers fanbase which had become accustomed to more enterprising soccer during the Caleb Porter era, but he knew defensive rigidity would provide the foundation for success. Let’s put it this way: in the two years the Timbers solidified its defense, the squad went to MLS Cup.
Will Gio return to pragmatic soccer, or will he try to reinstall a medium press that really didn’t work effectively? Rumor has it that Savarese is attempting to push the line up a bit more, but I’d be surprised to see it stick around based on the relatively unathletic backline plus an aging core.

Departures

Liam Ridgewell (CB): 2018 was a rollercoaster season for Ridgy. After being mentally absent during two bad losses at the beginning of March, Ridgewell was physically absent from the team for most of March to August after a ‘difference in opinion’ with Savarese (injuries played a part as well). During this time, his wife gave birth to a beautiful baby girl, but you could tell the former captain still spent those few months disheartened to not feature on the pitch. And let’s be clear, for all of his faults on and off the field, the man changed the course of our franchise. After years of dealing with a sieve of a backline (ft. superstars like Hanyer Mosquera, Raushawn McKenzie, Danny O’Rourke, and more), Ridgewell plugged the leaks and eventually captained the side to MLS Cup. The end of 2018 proved to be more of the same as he avoided tearing everything in his lower body and helped lead the team back to MLS Cup. Unfortunately, his tenure in green-and-gold ended after the cup final, but he should never have to buy a drink again in PDX. And boy does he love a drink or two (or seven).
Alvas Powell (RB): Few players in MLS regressed to the extent that Alvas Powell has since his very strong 2015 campaign. After playing a key role on the way to MLS Cup 2015, he failed to live up to his potential without Nat Borchers by his side. From 2016-2018, his suspect crossing never improved, he relied far too much on recovery speed, and he could never quite string together consistent performances.
We all wish Alvas the best of luck in Cincinnati. He’s a great kid, and we watched him grow and mature into the confident and funny presence he is today. However, with the amount of talent and athleticism he possesses, there’s no reason Zarek Valentin should have beaten him out for the starting RB spot once Villafaña returned from Santos Laguna. At 24, the Jamaican int’l can still revitalize his career with Alan Koch’s men, but he is at serious risk of becoming another case of “what if” if his stint in Cincy proves unsuccessful.
Samuel Armenteros (ST): One of the many TAM signings of the 2018 offseason, the Swedish int’l joined the club on loan from Serie A misfit Benevento. For a period of time from mid-May to mid-July, Armenteros was unconscious in front of goal. With a cultured left-foot and a penchant for Bergkamp-esque magic, we all thought replacing the recently-offloaded Fanendo Adi was a non-issue. However, things went south from there - and as I’ve heard, it wasn’t necessarily a fault of his own. With no break for over a year or more, his body simply began to break down, and soon enough the writing of his departure was on the wall. Even as Jeremy Ebobisse and Lucas Melano took over his spot in the squad, Armenteros remained an upbeat presence in the locker room and celebrated the club’s triumphs like one of the key contributors . In the end, we’ll be left to wonder what a break and another full season could’ve done for him.
Jake Gleeson (GK) : The big Kiwi’s departure means no Timbers remain from 2011’s inaugural season opener. Even with his big frame and the occasional spectacular, sprawling save, Gleeson never could quite control his penalty area or produce accurate distribution out of the back. Through a double whammy of injuries and an in-form Jeff Attinella, Gleeson’s tenure really ended back in mid-April but was officially announced this offseason with little fanfare. The rumor mill suggests he’s still sticking around Portland, so perhaps he may find a way back into the organization in an off-the-field capacity. Either way, for the first time since 2010, the Timbers will begin a professional season without Gleeson amongst its goalkeeping ranks.
Lawrence Olum (CDM): The “Kenyan Messi” departs after two years of spot duty at CB and CDM for the club. Some of us give the man a bad rap based on his inability to do much more than pass backwards and occupy space that would be otherwise seized by opposing attackers, but he wasn’t disastrous. In the end, after accumulating 52 appearances for the Timbers over the past two seasons, the next phase in Olum’s career commences.
Victor Arboleda (RM/LM): Arboleda departs after featuring mostly for Timbers 2 over the past few seasons. Outside of blistering pace, the young Colombian never displayed an ample skill-set to break into the league. There was some hope that he’d be the first T2 player to make a consequential impact on the first team, but any remaining hope was lost when he was ousted to make room for the incoming Tomas Conechny.
Jack Barmby (LM/CAM): The left-footed Englishman ends an inconspicuous three-year stint with Portland after not showing much to suggest he’s capable of playing at an MLS level. He recently joined USL outfit San Antonio FC and figures to be a part of SAFC’s plans at least for this season. Other than that, I don’t really have much to say - and that kinda says it all.
Has been training with the squad and still could be re-signed:
Roy Miller (CB): Throughout his MLS career, the Costa Rican has been the center of a few notable memes and running jokes. However, in 2017, he put together a pretty darn good season at CB before shredding his achilles the day before a crucial 2nd leg playoff matchup vs Houston. Consequently, he missed all of the 2018 season barring a few appearances with T2. I fully expected that would be the last we saw of Miller in Timbers green, but he’s been ever present in preseason training camp (although at LB...which is not his best spot). Roy is highly respected in the locker room, so I would not be shocked if he re-signed as a depth piece on a short-term deal.

2019 Outlook:

In one word: continuity. As of right now, I would imagine 9 or 10 starters from MLS Cup will walk out onto the pitch March 2 in Colorado, with the core of Valeri, Chara, Blanco, Mabiala, and more expected to produce big moments once again. However, with Providence Park undergoing renovations to incorporate an extra 4,000 seats, the Timbers will have to weather 12-straight road tests before taking on LAFC on June 1 in its cacophonous cauldron of a home. With the exception of a disastrous 2016, the Timbers are amongst the league’s best on the road since 2013, but 12 on the bounce is a daunting task for even the most battle-tested squads.
Extended road swings are no rarity in this league, and D.C. United proved a little momentum and a chunk of home games can catapult a team up the standings. From August 10 - September 25, the Timbers will have an opportunity to emulate the Black-and-Red as 10 teams venture into Providence Park during this stretch. The compacted 2019 schedule will likely prove to be an additional hurdle for an aging core, and no doubt the squad’s depth will be tested throughout the year. But even with these external factors, this team is talented enough to qualify for the playoffs, and anything less than the 7th seed will be a considerable failure.

Acquisitions:

Claude Dielna (CB): This one is puzzling to me. For a club known for scouring the globe to find and acquire talent, resorting to signing an intra-league defender (who was frozen out of the lineup from July 15 on) to a TAM contract seems….odd. I can understand the logic to a certain extent: as a left-footed, veteran presence, he could be an easy plug-and-play for the departed Liam Ridgewell. Additionally, as a Francophone, he’s immediately developed a connection with fellow defenders Larrys Mabiala and Bill Tuiloma, who also spent their youth careers in France. Ultimately, this change of scenery could prove to be more fruitful than his tenure in New England, however, the 31-year old Frenchman has played exclusively with the 2nd team during preseason. And he certainly didn’t look great when he was utterly shook by Adam Jahn of all people.
Jorge Moreira (RB): The most recent and likely the biggest (for now) offseason acquisition, Jorge Moreira has the potential to be one of the top RBs in MLS. With an impressive pedigree as a former River Plate regular and full Paraguayan int’l, Moreira will likely augment an already fearsome attack with a more attack-minded approach than Zarek Valentin. However, questions linger about his ability to adjust to MLS, in addition to concerns over a recent knee injury that sidelined him from October 2017 - August 2018. That said, with roughly 15 other native Spanish speakers amongst the squad (including 9 South Americans), I’m not extremely worried about his ability to acclimate to the team. Additionally, his injury seems to be a burden of the past and could be a blessing for Timbers supporters - he was a key contributor for one of this hemisphere’s biggest clubs, but the injury and subsequent youth movement/rise of Gonzalo Montiel allowed the Timbers to swoop in and sign him. Expect to see Valentin start the season to ease Moreira into the swing of things, but he should be the starter from then on.
Marvin Loría (LM/RM/CAM): There’s high hopes that Marvin Loría can make the transition between T2 and the first team even when others like Victor Arboleda have struggled to do so. The 21-year-old Costa Rican, who received his first national team cap against the US back in January, has a cultured left foot and doesn’t hesitate to rip from distance. However, he’s still very much a work in progress, and he’ll have to learn to cope with MLS level athleticism and quality while over-relying on his left foot. The door is open for him though - if Andy Polo fails hold down a starting spot, Loría could be right there to slot in.
Renzo Zambrano (CM): Another signing from T2, the Venezuelan int’l provides additional depth to the central midfield. In an appearance or two in the Open Cup, Zambrano looked the part of an MLS quality player, but he has a ways to go before overtaking Chara, Guzman, Paredes, or even Andres Flores. The T2 captain led the USL side in interceptions, tackles, and duels won, so if he can continue to grow in its engine room this season, Zambrano could be a potential solution for filling Chara’s shoes in the future.
Aljaz Ivačič (GK): The 25-year-old Slovenian int’l was acquired with an eye towards the future. After 43 appearances for Olimpija Ljubljana in his native country, Ivačič makes the switch across the Atlantic in search of a new challenge. However, shortly after arriving, the Timbers medical staff uncovered a leg injury that required surgery and will knock him out of training for the next 6-8 weeks. Fortunately, the front office was able to renegotiate around $200,000 off his original transfer fee because of it. With Steve Clark and Kendall McIntosh already on the roster, his inclusion in the team is not paramount, so this will be a guy to definitely keep an eye on for the upcoming seasons.
___ ____ (ST): ___ ____ is the designated player we were promised to be signing this offseason, but has yet to materialize. At first, the rumor mill churned out potential targets like Julian Quiñones and Ezequiel Ponce, but neither report evolved into anything substantial. As word began to travel that Gavin Wilkinson and co. were searching for a higher profile target, we were treated to accounts of a significant bid for Tigres forward, Eduardo Vargas. However, the Timbers were willing to spend $8.5mil while Tigres wanted a whopping $12.5mil, so Wilkinson and Paulson rightly balked at the offer.
So, we’re back to the drawing board with one week until kickoff. The club has been consistent and adamant, really since before MLS Cup, about wanting a DP attacker that will complement Ebobisse and elevate the rest of the squad. The championship window for the core is closing soon, and to be quite honest, Jebo still isn’t enough to maximize the team’s potential. The transfer window doesn’t end until May 7, but the likelihood of acquiring a high-profile player gets slimmer by the day. In the end, the Timbers may have to wait until the summer window when more players are available, although more suitors will emerge as well.

A word on everyone else:

Goalkeepers:
Jeff Attinella (GK): 2018 was a career year for Jeff, Jeff, Jeff. After years behind Nick Rimando and a one-year battle with Jake Gleeson, Attinella finally cemented himself as the #1 in April 2018. Apart from a few rare mishaps, Attinella was a solid and calming demeanor between the pipes, and his distribution out of the back was an understated catalyst for a deadly counter-attacking side. Now, he’ll enter 2019 as the undisputed starter which creates a whole new array of expectations for someone whose career has been defined by overcoming adversity.
For more on the man in net, I highly, highly recommend this podcast he did with Zarek Valentin. Timbers fan or not, it highlights the journey it takes to make it in MLS, and also provides a few intriguing insights into the likes of Nick Rimando and Tim Melia. Sometimes it’s difficult to appreciate that these players are just normal guys, but this interview does a tremendous job of teasing that out.
Steve Clark (GK): Some say Steve Clark has been a Timber since December 2015 even though he only arrived in August 2018 (sorry Crew fans). The MLS veteran keeper spelled Jeff Attinella in a few injury-relief appearances down the stretch and came up with a timely save or two. However, at this point in his career, Clark is nothing more than a solid backup, but he seems to enjoy Portland, so we’re glad to have him around.
Kendall McIntosh (GK): McIntosh is an undersized goalkeeper whose frame and athleticism is reminiscent of the likes of Nick Rimando. He’s been a career T2 netminder and is still very raw, but he’ll likely stick around with the first team until Ivačič returns from injury rehab. Expect him to be loaned back to T2 or to a lower league club elsewhere to gain experience when the Slovenian returns.
Defenders:
Zarek Valentin (RB/LB): Zarek Valentin is still the epitome of serviceable, and it has allowed him to carve out a pretty decent MLS career in spite of his lack of top-end footspeed. Probably one of the most outgoing and eccentric personalities on the team, Valentin’s value is just as present in the locker room as it is on the pitch, and he’ll continue to grow as a veteran leader this season. Valentin produces starter quality minutes at both fullback positions, but his low ceiling, particularly going forward and dealing with pacey wingers, means he’ll be fighting for time again in 2019. That said, we say the same thing coming into every year, and when all is said and done, Zarek has always found a way to contribute on the pitch.
Larrys Mabiala (CB): 2019 is a big year for the French-Congolese central defender. While he had his missteps as all centerbacks do, 2018 was generally a good year for Mabiala who bagged 5 goals and 2700+ minutes in one of the better defenses in Timbers’ history. His aerial presence and physicality gives trouble to even the Chad Marshalls and Kendall Wastons of the world, but the former PSG academy player is not the quickest over ground or the most vocal presence on the pitch. In particular, his vocal leadership will be tested this season without Liam Ridgewell’s boisterous and commanding nature beside him. It’s rare to find a moment where Mabiala doesn’t have the biggest smile or most upbeat attitude in the locker room, but he’s more of the type to go about his business in an understated manner. With the strenuous road stretch ahead, his play on the pitch and leadership on the backline will be put under a microscope. I think he can handle it, but it won’t be easy.
Bill Tuiloma (CB): Although Julio Cascante appears to have the edge based on preseason, the big Kiwi would be my pick to regularly start alongside Larrys Mabiala. After a few years with Marseille’s reserve sides, Tuiloma arrived as a T2 signing in 2017, but played in some crucial matches last season including the playoff 1st leg vs Seattle and 2nd leg @ Sporting KC. Outside of a few poor clears, he was solid when given the opportunity, and his better range and ability to pick out line-splitting passes are key assets to fit alongside Mabiala’s physical presence. In a lot of ways, he reminds me of an Aaron Long type player: a young, low salary, converted CDM who works his way up into an important role on the backline. His Francophone chemistry with Mabiala and Dielna may also serve him well, but anything over 700 first team minutes would be a new frontier for Tuiloma. Even though he will begin the season on the bench, expect him to mount a real challenge for the starting spot over the course of the year..
Julio Cascante (CB): After an inconsistent 2018 campaign, Cascante has emerged as the anticipated starter alongside Mabiala to the surprise of many. As I mentioned in Larrys’ blurb, all centerbacks make notable mistakes based on the nature of their position, but Cascante’s were usually more notable and more frequent. His height and build forges a formidable aerial pairing with Mabiala, but also causes him to struggle to sort his feet out in pressure-filled situations. Generally speaking, CB is a problematic position to have an unsettled rotation, and few Timbers’ fans have confidence that Cascante has the dependability to hold down the LCB spot on a regular basis. However, as the Costa Rican embarks on the prime of his career with a season under his belt and a surprising fluency in English, perhaps he will be the pleasant surprise of the year.
Jorge Villafaña (LB): El Sueño returned from a brief adventure in Mexico last August and put together a dependable if unremarkable end to the 2018 season. In many ways, Portland is home to the US int’l, as the Timbers picked him up as a Chivas USA outcast in 2014, and gave him an opportunity to become the best LB in club history. While he lacks ideal stature and athleticism, his crossing ability is second to none, and he offers a more dangerous attacking arsenal than Zarek Valentin. Like Valentin though, he struggled with pacey wingers ala Michael Barrios and hasn’t quite replicated the peak of his 2015 campaign where he consistently locked down the defensive left side. At 29, Jorge still has a few more good years left in his legs, but with Zarek hot on his heels, any dip in form could see him in an intense competition for a starting spot.
Marco Farfan (LB): I was pretty high on the Homegrown LB coming into 2018, but Farfan did not take the next step in his development last year. Again, he battled with injuries, and when he was given the opportunity to start at the beginning of last year, he struggled to keep up with the pace of the game. As the 20-year-old enters this campaign firmly behind Villafaña and Valentin on the depth chart, he’ll have his work cut out for him to convince the staff that he’s worthy of game action. However, Jeremy Ebobisse emerged from a similar situation last year - we’ll see if Farfan can stay fit enough to do the same.
Modou Jadama (CB/RB): After only one first team appearance in 2018, the Gambian shouldn’t feature too often this season. He provides cheap depth at both right back and center back, but will mostly be tasked with leading T2’s backline this year.
Midfielders:
Diego Valeri (CAM): There’s not much to say about the Maestro that hasn’t already been said. A top class player and an even better human being, Valeri will go down as one of the greatest signings in MLS history. After an MVP season with 21G and 12A in 2017, his production dropped off to 10G and 12A last season, although the dip could be attributed to a change of style and formation. Timbers fans and neutrals will certainly hope to see more of vintage Valeri whose direct and progressive style is eye candy to soccer lovers everywhere. In this house, we worship at the Church of Diego. Build the statue.
Sebastian Blanco (LM/RM): Sebastian Blanco is the human manifestation of when a smaller dog picks a fight with another dog 4x its size. But his temperamental and fierce nature on the pitch can only be matched by his moments of pure inspiration. Only the Timbers can boast that it had two double-digit G + A players last season, and as good as Valeri was again, Blanco probably outperformed him on the year. Left foot, right foot, or even with his head, the diminutive Argentine winger consistently uncorks bangers, and I’d expect to see more of the same in 2018. He’s the guy you’d hate to play against, but love to have on your team, and we’re certainly glad to see him on our side.
David Guzman (CDM): Matt Doyle on ETR said it best: Guzman’s an experienced 28-year-old with the erratic swings of a 19-year-old. From March to May 2017, he looked like the classic holding #6 to fit like a glove next to the ground-covering ability of Diego Chara. The rest of 2017? Almost a complete liability with the aggression of an angry bull and positional awareness of a lost child. After sustaining an injury that left him out of the rotation for much of Spring 2018, Guzman went to Russia with the Costa Rican national team and came back almost an entirely different player. During the stretch run, he appeared to have simplified his game, produced timely attacking support, and completely pantsed Michael Bradley. No doubt his sudden ascent to form helped propel the Timbers to MLS Cup, hinting at his importance to the team operating at an optimal level. However, relying on Guzman’s consistency is not an enviable position, so I’ll continue to hold stock in Cristhian Paredes.
Diego Chara (CDM): When I mentioned we worship at the Church of Diego, I didn’t just mean Valeri. At this point in his career, Chara has been mentioned perennially as the league’s most underrated player, but yet he’s still probably underrated somehow. Even with Valeri’s 2017 MVP season, the Colombian pitbull has continued to be (arguably) the team’s MVP every year, as Portland has not won any of the last 19 matches that Chara has not participated in. He has the ability to chase down Miguel Almiron, a pillowy first touch, an immense soccer IQ, and a fearless presence in the middle of the park - all qualities that make him the team’s most indispensable player. Although he’s shown Energizer Bunny levels of stamina and resolve, father-time is still undefeated. I don’t have any doubts about the soon-to-be 33-year-old’s ability to perform this season, but at some point someone will have to try to replicate his priceless productivity. Build the statue parte dos.
Andrés Flores (CM): Andres Flores is like a Toyota Camry - solid if unspectacular. He’s doesn’t have the sexy style that will garner all the attention, but when push comes to shove and you need to get from point A to point B, he’ll do the job. The El Salvadorian is an essential (and bilingual) piece in the locker room, and he has earned the trust of Savarese dating back to their time together at the New York Cosmos. Look for him to assist in spot-duty, but his most important contributions will likely be found in the little things off the pitch.
Cristhian Paredes (CM): For the first 3-4 months of the 2018 season, Cristhian Paredes was somewhere in between a good signing and a potential revelation in midfield. The young Paraguayan int’l was great over ground, calm on the ball, and look poised to be one of the season’s breakout players. Then, family tragedy struck. After his uncle passed away and Mom got sick, homesickness and guilt from being so far away from home hampered his play on the field. Still only a teenager and unable to speak English, his confidence faltered and was unable to clear the mental block necessary to get back in the team. This offseason, he was very open about his struggles, but he seems highly motivated to become a star on this team. Overall, his body looks more sculpted and his comfort with Gio and the squad will only improve. Who knows, maybe the 20-year-old will become one of the next big time transfers out of MLS.
Andy Polo (RM): With 1G, 2A in 1600 minutes, the Peruvian winger failed to produce anything substantial on the scoresheet during his first season in Portland. With that said, there’s two sides to the coin here. Yes, Polo needs to be more goal dangerous or at least find himself in more threatening spots to create gaps for his attacking partners. But a lot of what Polo brought to the table won’t always appear in the stats, as his defensive workrate and positioning was as impactful as we’ve ever seen from a Timbers winger. Year 2 will be big for Polo to show improvement, and no doubt his position as the RCM in a 4-3-2-1 and lengthy break to join Peru for the World Cup inhibited his inaugural campaign’s productivity. Although with Marvin Loría, Dairon Asprilla, Tomas Conechny, and possibly a new DP signing breathing down his neck, his leash may not be as long this season.
Tomas Conechny (LM/RM): When the former Argentine U-20 int’l arrived in Portland last summer, he accumulated only 79 minutes of first team action and frankly didn’t demonstrate much to elicit excitement. With an additional comfort with the city and the club, 2019 is bound to be different, and Conechny has shown glimpses of why the Timbers decided to renew his loan this preseason. Similar experiments with the likes of Jack Barmby have not yielded adequate results, though Conechny will still have the opportunity to establish himself as a vital depth piece.
Dairon Asprilla (RM): Also known as Señor noviembre, Dairon Asprilla is one of the league’s most inefficient high-volume shooters...unless he’s playing big time matches in November. After lacing this absolute belter vs Dallas in 2015 (in addition to a goal vs Houston in 2017), Asprilla continued his playoff hot streak with a equalizer and game winning PK conversion @ Seattle in that wacky 2nd leg. However, those moments pretty much highlighted Asprilla’s 2018. At this point, you know what you’re getting from the Colombian winger. Apart from occasional moments of magic, he’ll continue to struggle in front of net, although his energy and physicality will certainly push incumbent RM Andy Polo for game minutes. He’ll be an important depth piece, but if he’s forced to be anything more, the Timbers are in for a long season.
Eryk Williamson (CM): The 21-year-old former D.C. United Academy product spent half of last season on loan to Azorean club Santa Clara where he had limited involvement. I wouldn’t expect him to feature much this season, although he’ll have the opportunity to show himself in T2 matches. But hey, he’s Queen Latifah’s cousin.
Forwards:
Jeremy Ebobisse: A lot of people hopped aboard the Ebobisse hype train following a string of quality performances down the stretch. But make no mistake, the young American has to become more goal dangerous before he earns the complete trust and confidence of Savarese and the FO. His hold-up play is generally strong, and it’s not imperative that he puts in double-digit goals with Blanco and Valeri behind him. At the same time, it’s valid to wonder if his ceiling is high enough to maximize what may be the last year in the core’s championship window. The former 4th overall draft pick will have the opportunity to lead the line at least for the first few months, but the DP forward is bound to arrive sooner or later. If Ebobisse takes the next step in his development, the DP will step in alongside him in one of the most frightening attacks in the league. But if he doesn’t, he could be replaced and quickly forgotten. Twelve months ago, Jebo was buried behind Fanendo Adi and Samuel Armenteros with little hope of breaking into the first team. Now, he’s likely the opening day starter with MLS Playoff experience and two superstars to support him. The ball’s in his court. (He won the Tucson tourney golden boot so good start!)
Lucas Melano: The 2019 version of Lucas Melano might just challenge your preconceived notions of one of the biggest DP busts of the last half-decade. Melano’s first stint in Portland was marred by petulance, laziness, and an inability to convert in front of goal, all of which contributed to a 1.5 year exile back to Argentina. I’ll be the first to admit, I was fairly vocal about not wanting him back, but Melano has shown us something different since returning midseason. While he’s far from a clinical finisher and still has a Nagbe-esque distrust in his left foot, he seems to have a clearer picture of what he wants to do on the field. Part of that comes from a position switch from winger to striker, and part stems from comfort off the pitch. During his time in Argentina, Melano continued to take English classes with an eye on returning to Portland. He’s no longer a DP player with the pressure to perform like a DP, and his explosive pace will provide both a spark off the bench and a stark contrast to Ebobisse’s hold up style.
Foster Langsdorf (ST): After 14 goals in 29 appearances for T2 last season, the second-year Homegrown signing might have a slight chance of first team minutes until the DP signing arrives. A Stanford graduate who finished his collegiate career with the most goals in Pac-12 history, Langsdorf doesn’t possess a particularly imposing skillset but seems to just find himself in the right place at the right time. In that way, he’s almost a poor man’s Wondo, although it remains to be seen whether his poacher’s instinct is sufficient enough to cut it at this level.
Predicted Starting XI:
4-2-3-1
Best Case Scenario:
Valeri, Chara, and Blanco put up another Best XI caliber campaign. The backline is solid if not great, and one of Tuiloma, Cascante, or Dielna establishes themselves as a go-to CB option. Ebobisse takes the next step, and the younger side of the squad makes a big leap right alongside him. The Timbers comfortably exit its 12-game road excursion with 4 or 5+ wins and dismantles all opponents who dare to enter the cauldron that is Providence Park during the 10 game homestand. A top seed is secured for the playoffs and the late season momentum catapults the boys in green all the way back to MLS Cup.
Worst Case Scenario:
The large road trip takes its toll on the squad both in the standings and on the injury report. Valeri and/or Chara succumb to the death-grip of father time, while the backline is a rotating cast of suckitude. None of the young guns or new acquisitions are able to contribute effectively, and the Timbers can’t dig themselves out of a hole going down the stretch. Just like 2014 and 2016, Portland is unable to follow up a successful season with a playoff berth, and #GioOut and #GWOut become vogue amongst a passionate but melodramatic fanbase.
Realistic Scenario:
Probably somewhere in between. The record before June 1st is thrown out the window as the newly renovated Providence Park (and Gold Cup break) provide a critical refresher. Valeri and/or Blanco put up another double digit G/A season, while Chara is indispensable as ever. The backline is middle-of-the-road, but good enough to prop up an ever-potent attack. The Timbers finish somewhere between the 4th and 7th seed and provide another difficult challenge for the Western Conference’s higher seeds.
Prediction:
I’ll say 5th seed and upset or two in the playoffs before petering out. This team isn’t really constructed to compete for a Supporter’s Shield, but it’s a complete pain in the neck to confront in a playoff format. On any given day, Valeri and Blanco can take over a match, and if the Timbers acquire an Eduardo Vargas or Julian Quiñones, the front three of four will completely shred you to pieces on the counter. On the flipside, the backline doesn’t always inspire confidence, and David Guzman is a complete wild card in an important spot in the middle of the park. As a result, when all pieces are in-form, the Timbers can beat anyone, anywhere. When a few pieces are off-kilter, conceding three (bad) first half goals in Minnesota becomes a stark reality. Overall, it won’t be the end of the world, but it may be a disappointment in terms of potentially the core’s last hurrah.

Bonus predictions:

  • Timbers Army member, who claims to be an Active Supporter™, tweets out something to the effect of “I’m not supporting this club until significant changes are made” during a tough stretch early on. The use of the Rose City ‘Til I Die hashtag is still used unironically.
  • Following an egregious, match-deciding missed called by Ted Unkel, Merritt Paulson throws hands with a front office staffer attempting to prevent him from re-accessing his Twitter account
  • Sebastian Blanco whips out his celebratory Chucky mask following another sublime goal. A local ball-kid who is close to the action develops frequent nightmares as a result of the event.
  • After the final whistle of the first draw of the season, the squad deliberates with Zarek Valentin to ensure that penalty kicks are not to follow.
  • Lucas Melano attempts to use his left foot. The resulting product is so shocking that Timbers fans vow to never speak of it again. All who witnessed the disaster are scarred for eternity.

Online Resources

Official Links: Website | Twitter
Local Coverage: Oregon Live | Stumptown Footy
Best Podcast ft. Jeff Attinella and Zarek Valentin: From J to Z
Best Twitter follows: Jamie Goldberg | Chris Rifer | There’s also Richard Farley, the club’s official writer, but he often uses his “status” to act like a condescending prick before pseudo-apologizing in a patronizing and insincere manner. So, if that’s your thing, go ahead and give him a follow.
Subreddit: timbers

#RCTID

submitted by NewRCTID22 to MLS [link] [comments]

how to deposit money in iqoption How to use the Multiplier with IQ Option Forex Trading ... Iq Option Ultimate Candlestick Patterns - Powerful ... Automated Trading on IQ Option [Free Robot](16+) - YouTube 100% winning strategy  iq option strategy 2020  moving ...

Ian Clayton Gallagher was born in 1996 in Metz, and is often the most strong-hearted, persistent, and goofy -yet currently reckless- third oldest child in the Gallagher family. He is presumably the product of a PCP-fueled affair between his mother Monica Gallagher and Frank Gallagher's brother, Clayton Gallagher, in the summer of 1995. Ian has been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder; he currently ... (3-4 years later) I was hitting my ex up on Twitter just fucking w/ him. Telling him to stfu on his post (jokingly) & I took it to the dms. We went back & forth w/ conversation and he was like why don’t you just text me and so we did. Later on while texting I felt like this really bad feeling like I shouldn’t be talking to him. Trade stocks, ETFs, forex & Digital Options at IQ Option, one of the fastest growing online trading platforms. Sign up today and be a part of 17 million user base at IQ Option. View Liam Cummins's business profile as Director at LTC Group. Find contact's direct phone number, email address, work history, and more. Wirecard and GreyMountain Headquarters in Dublin. Wirecard UK & Ireland Ltd has its registered office in Ulysses House on 1 Foley Street in Dublin, Ireland on the first floor. GreyMountain Management Ltd also sat there – on the 3rd floor. The company was founded in 2014 and went into liquidation after numerous warnings from financial market supervisory authorities and an investigation into ...

[index] [3083] [5034] [2026] [1037] [87] [3186] [5086] [4064] [1509] [3006]

how to deposit money in iqoption

IQ Options Scam Hai? Full explanation #IQOptions ★★★★★★★ FOLLOW: Azad Chaiwala Motivator Of Pakistani Millionaires ★★★★★★★ # FaceBook: https://Facebook.com... Iq Option Ultimate Candlestick Patterns Powerful Analysis 99% WORK iq option strategy 2019 olymp trade strategy 2019 IQ OPTION AUTO TRADING http://bit.ly/2K9... ===== '' subscribe my channel for more video '' ===== This is my binary options strategy channel. Here I always give new tricks of binary options trad... REGISTRATE EN IQ OPTION Y SE PARTE DE MI COMUNIDAD CON MI LINK 😎 https://affiliate.iqoption.com/redir/?aff=126963 Ingresa a los Temibles VIP: https://www.you... Adjust the interface, select an asset and the expiration time, chose your investment amount. Now, where will the chart go? https://iqoption.com/?aff=97688&af...

#